All Ages

PRFDHR Seminar: Refugee-led Responses to Overlapping Precarity: Views from North Lebanon, Professor Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

Professor Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh traces the different ways that residents of Baddawi refugee camp in North Lebanon have been affected by COVID-19 since March 2020, and how they have been responding to protect themselves and other conflict-affected people in the midst of the pandemic. The latter include processes that resonate with a long history of refugee-led mutual aid initiatives.

PRFDHR Seminar: Prison or Sanctuary? An Evaluation of Camps for Syrian Refugees, Dr. Thomas Ginn

Camps are a controversial strategy to manage an influx of refugees. Host countries want to minimize negative effects on citizens, but relief organizations worry that isolation reduces employment and self-reliance over time. Using a large and representative survey, Dr. Ginn studies Syrians in Jordan and Iraq, comparing camp residents to other refugees who self-settle in the same country. He identifies the effects of camp residence with multiple strategies: controlling for a rich set of observables, and a difference-in-differences with Lebanon where camps were never opened.

PRFDHR Seminar: Impacts of a Refugee Shelter Program: Experimental Evidence from the Syrian Refugee Life Survey, Professor Edward Miguel

With a record number of refugees moving across the globe, there is much debate among policymakers and academics on how best to provide for refugees’ humanitarian needs while also ensuring the stability of host countries’ political and economic institutions and preventing radicalization among affected groups. As a result, many non-profits and intergovernmental organizations have come together to implement programs that support both refugees and host communities.

PRFDHR Seminar: Growing up Under Forced Displacement: Evidence from Bangladesh and Jordan, Professor Sarah Baird and Professor Jennifer Seager

Cumulative trauma due to displacement and exposure to violence can lead to long-run impacts on mental health, with consequences for human capital accumulation. This may be particularly true for adolescents given that this is a time of intensified emotional distress and a critical period for development. Using mixed-methods longitudinal data from the Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE) study on over 6,000 refugee adolescents aged 10-17 and their local peers in Bangladesh and Jordan this research explores the challenges faced by adolescents growing up under forced displacement.

Webinar: Defying Illegality: Organizing in and around Migrant Detention

Amidst ongoing debates about policing and mass incarceration, migrant detention centers have been focal points for mobilizations against the U.S. carceral regime. Through coordinated protest, testimonial acts, and hunger strikes, incarcerated migrants have drawn attention to systemic abuses in prisons, while defending their rights to belonging, family unification, and transnational mobility. Their actions revealed the ways that ICE used the COVID-19 pandemic to further repress prisoners.

PRFDHR Seminar: Outsourcing Otherness: Race and Belonging in the Morocco-EU Border - Dr. Leslie Gross-Wyrtzen

Studies on European countries “outsourcing” border enforcement and immigration control to neighboring states pose questions about how sovereignty travels beyond nation-state territories; how such transnational regimes are organized in line with market rationalities; and how liberal or humanitarian discourse often reinforces security regimes. Less explored is the relationship between European racial imaginaries, transnational border projects, and shifts in racial-social categories of belonging in neighboring countries.

COVID and the Global Order: Global Migration and Movement Across Borders

The Jackson Institute and the Yale Law School Center for Global Legal Challenges will co-host the discussion, “Global Migration and Movement Across Borders,” featuring: Monette Zard, Allan Rosenfield Associate Professor of Forced Migration and Health, Director of the Forced Migration and Health Program, Heilbrunn Department of Population and Family Health Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health; and Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Distinguished Transatlantic Fellow, co-Founder, and President Emeritus, Migration Policy Institute.

PRFDHR Seminar: A Market for Work Permits - Professor Martin Ravallion

It will be politically difficult to liberalize international migration without protecting host-country workers. Professor Martin Ravallion explores in this work the scope for efficiently managing migration using a competitive market for work permits. Host-county workers would have the option of renting out their citizenship work permit for a period of their choice, while foreigners purchase time-bound work permits. Aggregate labor supply need not rise in the host country. However, total output would rise and workers would see enhanced social protection.

PRFDHR Seminar: Gang Rule: Understanding and Countering Criminal Governance - Professor Chris Blattman

Gangs rule millions worldwide. Professor Chris Blattman studies how gangs govern, why, and whether the state can reclaim dominance. He first interviews dozens of gang leaders and thousands of residents in Medellin, Colombia, documenting this clandestine world. They govern to preserve local monopoly rents, but also because the state is remote. To demonstrate, Professor Blattman first harness exogenous variation in exposure to the state across internal borders. Over the long run, places more distant from police and services increase gang rule.

PRFDHR Seminar: Creating Coexistence: Intergroup Contact and Soccer in Post-ISIS Iraq

Can intergroup contact build social cohesion after war? Dr. Salma Mousa answers this question by randomly assigning Iraqi Christians displaced by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) to an all-Christian soccer team or to a team mixed with Muslims. She finds that the intervention improved behaviors toward Muslim peers: Christians with Muslim teammates were more likely to vote for a Muslim (not on their team) to receive a sportsmanship award, register for a mixed team next season, and train with Muslims six months after the intervention.

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