Faculty

Good Society Forum: Human Rights Protection in Africa

The new normal way of living as a result of COVID-19 has huge repercussions on the human rights (economic, social and cultural rights) of most vulnerable groups. Human rights as defined by the UN means ‘’rights that are fundamental to all human beings regardless of race, sex, ethnicity, nationality, language, religion or any other status. These rights include the right to life and liberty, freedom from slavery and torture, freedom of opinion and expression, the right to work and education, and many more such as clean environment have become important to uphold.

Physical and Mental Health of Refugees: A COVID-19 Update

This 6th annual refugee health educational event will provide updates for health care providers and community members regarding ongoing clinical and non-clinical domestic advocacy efforts to support the health of refugee families during the Covid-19 pandemic. The conference will take place virtually as part of Yale Medicine’s Global Health Day Activities on March 18, 2021.

PRFDHR Seminar: The Causes and Consequences of Ethnic Violence in Myanmar, Dr. Paula López Peña

The Rohingya crisis is one of the world’s worst ongoing human-rights atrocities, but its causes are contested and its consequences are poorly understood. Dr. López Peña and her co-authors marshal a variety of existing and original data to shed light on its drivers, characteristics, and human cost. First, in contrast with the government’s preferred narrative, they show that violence against civilians in Myanmar clearly responds to economic motives: it increases during times when international rice prices are high, in places suitable for rice cultivation.

PRFDHR Seminar: Refugee-led Responses to Overlapping Precarity: Views from North Lebanon, Professor Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

Professor Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh traces the different ways that residents of Baddawi refugee camp in North Lebanon have been affected by COVID-19 since March 2020, and how they have been responding to protect themselves and other conflict-affected people in the midst of the pandemic. The latter include processes that resonate with a long history of refugee-led mutual aid initiatives.

PRFDHR Seminar: Prison or Sanctuary? An Evaluation of Camps for Syrian Refugees, Dr. Thomas Ginn

Camps are a controversial strategy to manage an influx of refugees. Host countries want to minimize negative effects on citizens, but relief organizations worry that isolation reduces employment and self-reliance over time. Using a large and representative survey, Dr. Ginn studies Syrians in Jordan and Iraq, comparing camp residents to other refugees who self-settle in the same country. He identifies the effects of camp residence with multiple strategies: controlling for a rich set of observables, and a difference-in-differences with Lebanon where camps were never opened.

PRFDHR Seminar: Impacts of a Refugee Shelter Program: Experimental Evidence from the Syrian Refugee Life Survey, Professor Edward Miguel

With a record number of refugees moving across the globe, there is much debate among policymakers and academics on how best to provide for refugees’ humanitarian needs while also ensuring the stability of host countries’ political and economic institutions and preventing radicalization among affected groups. As a result, many non-profits and intergovernmental organizations have come together to implement programs that support both refugees and host communities.

PRFDHR Seminar: Growing up Under Forced Displacement: Evidence from Bangladesh and Jordan, Professor Sarah Baird and Professor Jennifer Seager

Cumulative trauma due to displacement and exposure to violence can lead to long-run impacts on mental health, with consequences for human capital accumulation. This may be particularly true for adolescents given that this is a time of intensified emotional distress and a critical period for development. Using mixed-methods longitudinal data from the Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE) study on over 6,000 refugee adolescents aged 10-17 and their local peers in Bangladesh and Jordan this research explores the challenges faced by adolescents growing up under forced displacement.

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