Course Listings

Spring 2023
Course number Course title Course description Course instructor Course date
  • 30170-01
International Refugee Assistance Project

International Refugee Assistance Project (30170). 3 units. This course is designed to give students an opportunity to learn about international refugee law in theory and in practice. Students enrolled in the seminar will work under the supervision of attorneys to assist persecuted individuals abroad seeking safe legal passage to the United States or another country through client assistance, research, or advocacy projects. The course will provide the students with the practical and theoretical knowledge necessary to be effective practitioners of international refugee law.

  • Poellot
  • Prabhu
  • Majeed
Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
  • 30195-01 (Fieldwork)
  • 30194-01 (Seminar)
Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic
Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Fieldwork (30195). 2 units. Students must enroll simultaneously in the seminar and fieldwork components of this clinic. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to six new students. B. Haldeman.
 
Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Seminar (30194) and Fieldwork (30195). 2 units, for each component, 4 units total. Students may elect credit/fail and must do so by the stated deadline each term. Students must be enrolled in the seminar and fieldwork components simultaneously.
 
  • Haldeman
Wed 5:10 PM-7:00 PM
  • 30173-01
Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic

Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30173). 4 units. Students will work on a variety of human rights projects, generally in support of advocacy efforts of human rights organizations. Projects are designed to give students practical experience with the range of activities in which lawyers engage to promote respect for human rights; to help students build the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective human rights advocates; and to integrate the theory and practice of human rights.

  • Silk
  • Metcalf
  • Beckerle
Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
  • 30127-01 (Seminar)
  • 30128-01 (Fieldwork)
Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic
Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic (30127) and Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). Students will represent immigrants and low-wage workers in Connecticut in labor, immigration, and other civil rights areas, through litigation for individuals and non-litigation advocacy for community-based organizations. In litigation matters, students will handle cases at all stages of legal proceedings in Immigration Court, Board of Immigration Appeals, U.S. District Court, the Second Circuit, and state courts.
  • Ahmad
  • Wishnie
Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
  • AMST 206
  • ER&M 221
  • WGSS 222
Introduction to Critical Refugee Studies

Reconfiguring refugees as fluid subjects and sites of social, political, and cultural critiques. Departing from dominant understandings of refugees as victims, consideration instead of refugees as complex historical actors, made visible through processes of colonization, imperialism, war, displacement, state violence, and globalization, as well as ethical, social, legal, and political transformations. Focus on second-half of the twentieth century.

  • Quan Tran
T 9:25-11:15a
  • E&RS 540
  • WGSS 825
Decolonizing Europe

Decolonial theory imagines a world different from the one created by the dominance of Western modernity. However, it is not necessarily obvious what Europe can contribute to this process, as the decentering of Europe and its intellectual traditions are tenets of decolonial theory; the continent is arguably the only one in which Europeans do not appear as colonizers. In this class, following authors such as Aimé Césaire, Stuart Hall, and Houria Bouteldja, we approach Europe as a space that is key to the global process of decolonization.

  • Fatima El-Tayeb
T 1:30-3:20p
  • GLBL 6210
Arab Spring, Arab Winter, and U.S. Policy in the Middle East and North Africa

This seminar reviews how the United States has responded to weakening states and unrest in the MENA region. Each session examines a particular policy challenge, examining dynamics on the ground, what Washington understood to be its national security interest, and how it developed its policies in terms of strategies and tactics to achieve the perceived national interest. The seminar ranges from the 2013 coup d’état in Egypt to American approaches to political Islam to wars in Yemen, Libya, and Syria.

  • Robert Ford
HTBA
  • GLBL 7270
Development in Action

This course is an immersion into the “how” of international development, done through a case study of and practicum in Jordan with Turquoise Mountain, an NGO working to preserve heritage in areas of conflict. It is not meant to establish the “how to’s” but is more concerned with the messiness, the human factor, the opportunities, and the realities.  We take an in-depth look at the elements—and the complexities—of building and running successful projects, including: How do you build community support? How can you work and get things done with government bureaucracies?

  • Shoshana Stewart
HTBA
  • HIST 663
Europe and Difference

This graduate reading seminar examines the construction of notions of “Europeanness” during the twentieth century by exploring the histories of various communities that European society has marked as “other” in some way.  We will consider the shifting places that Jewish, Muslim, Black, Queer, migrant, refugee, and guest worker communities have occupied in Europe over the past century and a half; the ways they have been denied full membership in legal and civil society; how they have battled those exclusions; and the contributions these communities have made to modern European society.

  • Jennifer Allen
M 9:25-11:15a
  • ECON 340
  • PLSC 359
Economics and Politics of Development

This course coves recent scholarship on the political economy of development. It starts with the study of macro-historical facts and move on to micro issues, such as conflict and corruption.

Prerequisite: Intermediate microeconomics and Econometrics (ECON 117 or equivalent). 

  • Gerard Padro
TTh 9-10:15a
  • ER&M 332
Cultural and Racial History of Mental Health

Since the 1960s, social scientists have analyzed how the scientific ideas about mental illness, mental health policies, institutions, healing practices, and popular discourses surrounding mental health have been influenced by the social and cultural contexts. This course introduces students to the debates and questions guiding the history of mental health since the Civil Rights and the Psychiatric Survivor Movements in the 1960s, especially those that relate to Critical Race Theory.

  • Ximena Lopez Carrillo
T 9:25-11:15a
  • ANTH 386
  • GLBL 393
Humanitarian Interventions: Ethics, Politics, and Health

Analysis of humanitarian interventions from a variety of social science disciplinary perspectives. Issues related to policy, legal protection, health care, morality, and governance in relation to the moral imperative to save lives in conditions of extreme adversity. Promotion of dialogue between social scientists and humanitarian practitioners.

  • Catherine Panter-Brick
W 1:30-3:20p
  • GLBL 6150
Contemporary Development Issues in Latin America and the Caribbean

This course surveys current development issues in Latin America and the Caribbean. Students gain significant knowledge and practical understanding of the Region’s socioeconomic situation as well as relevant political issues that impact development. The course focuses on key regional issues in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean, with particular attention to “hot spot” countries like Venezuela, Colombia, Haiti, and Cuba.

  • Jessica Faieta
HTBA
  • EP&E 248
  • PLSC 256
American Political Institutions

The origins and development of American political institutions, especially in relation to constitutional choice and the agency of persons seeking freedom, equality, and self-governing capabilities as a driver of constitutional change.  Key concepts include: American federalism, compound republic, citizenship, social movements, racial justice, and nonviolence.

  • Michael Fotos
HTBA
  • ECON 465
  • GLBL 330
  • EP&E
Debating Globalization

Facets of contemporary economic globalization, including trade, investment, and migration. Challenges and threats of globalization: inclusion and inequality, emerging global players, global governance, climate change, and nuclear weapons proliferation.

Prerequisite: background in international economics and data analysis. Preference to seniors majoring in Economics or EP&E.

  • Ernesto Zedillo
HTBA
  • ER&M 401
Writer/Rioter: Public Writing in the 21st Century

In his collection Lunch with A Bigot: The Writer in the World, Amitava Kumar asks “What divides the writer from the rioter?” This class is concerned with unpacking the various ways writers participate in the 21st century world as disturbers of the peace. This century has seen great advances in technology, health, alternative energies, new forms of communication, but also vast consolidations of power, mass incarceration, climate change, poverty, homelessness, wars, state surveillance, and sexual violence.

  • Leah Mirakhor
HTBA
  • ANTH 447
  • ANTH 538
  • MMES 447
Culture and Politics in the Contemporary Middle East

In the decade since the 2011 Arab uprisings, the challenges facing the Middle East have been profound. They include various forms of war and displacement, political and economic instability, social upheaval and societal rupture. Indeed, by 2015, millions of Middle Eastern men, women, and children had been driven from their homes by conflict. This advanced undergraduate/graduate seminar is designed to explore some of the most important contemporary cultural and political shifts that are shaping life across the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).

  • Marcia Inhorn
M 3:30-5:20p
  • HIST 118J
U.S. Immigration Policy: History, Politics, and Activism, 1607-Present

How can we study a history so broad, complex, and evolving as the history of American immigration policy?  This course explores that question by studying U.S. immigration law, politics, and activism from the colonial era to the present day.  Chronologically, we particularly examine: (1) antebellum immigration policy in the context of forced migration, settler colonialism, and slavery, (2) the rise of a federal “gatekeeping” immigration regime in the post-Civil War era, and (3) transformations in immigration policymaking and policies during the long twentieth century.

  • Brendan Shanahan
T 9:25-11:15a
  • AMST 298
  • ER&M 288
Remembering the Korean War

The Korean War, though often narrated as a “forgotten war” and a “police action,” marks a crucial period in the US imperial expansion into Asia. This course proceeds from the recognition that the Korean War remains ongoing, and asks how to “remember” the violent and unresolved legacies of the “hot” wars that have constituted the cold war in Asia. How have the Korean War and its legacies shaped the relationship between militarism and empire? How has warfare conditioned the movements and lives of the Korean diaspora?

  • Madeleine Han
MW 11:35a-12:50p
  • EAST 425
  • ER&M 411
  • SOCY 425
Migration in East Asia and Beyond

Over the past few decades, East Asia has become a new destination region for migrants, the phenomenon of which is continuing to cause fierce public and political discussions on national identity and immigration and integration policies. This course explores various types, debates, and industries of migration in contemporary East Asia.

  • Staff
HTBA
  • ER&M 387
  • AMST 638
Migrants and Borders in the Americas

Migration and human mobility across North America, with a focus on 1994 to the present. Critical and thematic readings examine Central America, Mexico, and the United States as  integrated spaces of migration, governance, and cultural and social exchange. Migrant social movements, indigenous migration, gender and sexual dynamics of migration, human trafficking, crime and social violence, deportation and detention, immigration policing, and militarized security.

  • Alicia Schmidt Camacho
T 3:30-5:20p
  • ANTH 414
  • EAST 417
  • ANTH 575
  • EAST 575
Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

  • Helen Siu
T 1:30-3:20p
  • ECON 458
The Economics of Population

An overview of some basic demographic methods such as the life table and age-standardized rates, followed by consideration of the core topics in economic demography: fertility, mortality, and migration, along with their connections to the economy and economic development. The course is largely based on reading and discussion of journal articles.

  • Timothy Guinnane
W 1:30-3:20p
  • ER&M 187
  • HIST 107
  • AMST 133
Introduction to American Indian History

Survey of American Indian history, beginning with creation traditions and migration theories and continuing to the present day. Focus on American Indian nations whose homelands are located within the contemporary United States. Complexity and change within American Indian societies, with emphasis on creative adaptations to changing historical circumstances.

  • Ned Blackhawk
TTh 10:30-11:20a
  • HIST 109J
  • HSHM 489
Activism and Advocacy in the History of American Health Care

Is health care a human right? Can health advocacy shape health policy? What does it mean to be a health “activist” and to demand change of medicine? Health care in America has always been political. In this seminar students explore the rich history of health activism and health advocacy in the modern United States, focusing primarily on the postwar period through the present day. Each week we encounter new varieties of grassroots organizing, individual activists, and advocacy organizations that have made political claims about health care and pushed for its reform.

  • Kelly O'Donnell
Th 3:30-5:20p
  • HIST 310J
Continuities and Discontinuities of Violence in Latin America

During the second half of the twentieth century, many Latin American countries experienced intense political conflict and waves of repression at the hands of government forces. This course introduces students to the histories of Latin American countries that experienced dictatorships and authoritarian regimes during the Cold War and traces their development into the democratic transitions and current attempts to come to terms with the legacies of violence.

  • Maria Aguilar
T 3:30-5:20p
  • LITR 473
  • MMES 164
Politics and Literature in the Middle East

This course considers the relationship between literature and politics in Turkey, Iran, and the Arab world since the late 19th century. We read novels, short stories, poetry, essays, play scripts, and comics, and watch movies, while situating them in their artistic and political contexts. This course considers the ways that an artwork can intervene in the political debates of its time, while taking seriously the distinctive modes of political thought that are possible only through art.

  • Samuel Hodgkin
HTBA
  • HIST 458J
  • SAST 421
Environmentalism from the Global South

Most histories of the environmental movement still privilege the American and European experience. This research seminar examines the diverse forms of environmental thought and activism that have emerged from the global South—drawing examples from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America—since the early twentieth century.

  • Sunil Amrith
Th 1:30-3:20p
  • 30171-01
Advanced International Refugee Assistance Project

Advanced International Refugee Assistance Project (30171). 2 or 3 units. A fieldwork option. Students may enroll for 2 units (the default) for fieldwork only without a seminar and not for experiential credit or for 3 units with a required seminar and experiential credit. Prerequisite: International Refugee Assistance Project. Open only to JD and MSL students. Permission of the instructors required. S. Poellot, M. Prabhu and A. Majeed. 

  • Poellot
  • Prabhu
  • Majeed
HTBA
  • 30203-01 (Fieldwork)
Advanced Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic

Advanced Legal Assistance Clinic: Immigrant Rights: Fieldwork (30203). 1 to 4 units. Open only to students who have completed Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. B. Haldeman.  

  • Haldeman
HTBA
  • 30174-01
Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic

Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30174). 1 to 4 units, depending on project workload. Open only to students who have completed the Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. J.J. Silk, H.R. Metcalf, and K. Beckerle.

  • Silk
  • Metcalf
  • Beckerle
Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
  • 30130-01 (Fieldwork)
  • 30129-01 (Seminar)
Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic
Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork (30130). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Students may elect to take the fieldwork section without enrolling in the advanced seminar section.Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M. Ahmad and M.J. Wishnie.
 
  • Ahmad
  • Wishnie
Wed 9:10 AM-10:00 AM
  • 21193-01
Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events

Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events (21193). 1 unit, credit/fail. Conducted in workshop format and led by Professor James Silk, Director of the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights, the course will examine contemporary issues in human rights practice and theory. Guest speakers, including scholars, advocates and journalists, will present each week on a diverse range of topics in human rights. Readings are generally distributed in advance of each session.

  • Kahn
  • Metcalf
  • Silk
Thu 12:10 PM-1:45 PM
Fall 2022
Course number Course title Course description Course instructor Course date
  • 20568-01
Sexuality, Gender, Health, and Human Rights

Sexuality, Gender, Health, and Human Rights (20568). 2 units. This course will explore the application of human rights perspectives and practices to issues in regard to sexuality, gender, and health. Through reading, interactive discussion, paper presentation, and occasional outside speakers, students will learn the tools and implications of applying rights and law to a range of sexuality and health-related topics.

  • Miller
Thu 9:25 AM-11:15 AM
  • 20837-01
The Russo-Ukrainian War

The Russo-Ukrainian War (20837). 2 units. The course will examine the many legal aspects of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, providing students a comprehensive, integrated sense of whether and how national and international legal systems can address such challenges.

  • Fidell
Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
  • AFAM 459
  • ER&M 402
  • AMST 479
The Displaced: Migrant and Refugee Narratives of the 20th and 21st Centuries

This course examines a series of transnational literary texts and films that illuminate how the displaced—migrants, exiles, and refugees— remake home away from their native countries. The twentieth and twenty-first centuries have produced massive displacements due to wars, genocides, racial, ethnic and religious conflicts, economic and climate change, among other factors.

  • Leah Mirakhor
W 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • 30128-01 (Fieldwork)
  • 30127-01 (Seminar)
Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic

Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. M. Ahmad.

  • Ahmad
Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
  • GLBL 313
The United Nations on the Ground

This course explores the role and functioning of the United Nations at the country level from the perspective of the three mandates or pillars of the UN Charter. 1) Peace and Security, and in particular the Peace-keeping operations: how do they work? Who decides to send a UN mission to a country? what do they do in each country? 2) Development: How does the UN helps countries achieve the Sustainable Development Goals?

  • Jessica Faieta
W 9:25-11:15a
  • GLBL 244
  • PLSC 445
The Politics of Fascism

The subject of this course is fascism: its rise in Europe in the 1930s and deployment during the Second World War as a road map to understanding the resurgence of nationalism and populism in today’s political landscape, both in Europe and the United States. The course begins with an examination of the historic debates around fascism, nationalism, populism, and democracy.

  • Lauren Young
T 1:30-3:20p
  • HMRT 400
Advanced Human Rights Colloquium

This course is the culminating seminar for Yale College seniors in the Multidisciplinary Academic Program in Human Rights (Human Rights Scholars). The goal of the colloquium is to help students conceive and produce a meaningful capstone project as a culmination of their work in the program. It is a singular opportunity for students to pursue in-depth research in human rights.

Open only to Human Rights Scholars in their senior year and a requirement for completing the program. 

  • Jim Silk
HTBA
  • HIST 273J
  • SOCY 204
  • MMES 204
Empire, Nation, and Decolonization

What is an empire? What is a nation?  How do these interact in moments of crisis like decolonization? This course examines how spatial boundaries and social boundaries interact as empires expand, both over land and over seas, and as empires contract.  Our central focus is how the “nation” works as a contested notion, and a contented boundary, within the broader frame of empire. We trace struggles over national identities as metropolitan cores and colonial peripheries have been produced in the Americas (including the Caribbean), Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa.

  • Jonathan Wyrtzen
Th 1:30-3:20p
  • AFST 277
  • ANTH 235
  • ER&M 277
Introduction to Critical Border Studies

This course serves as an introduction into the major themes and approaches to the study of border enforcement and the management of human mobility. We draw upon a diverse range of scholarship across the social sciences as well as history, architecture, and philosophy to better understand how we find ourselves in this present “age of walls” (Tim Marshall 2019).

  • Leslie Gross-Wyrtzen
T 9:25-11:15a
  • AFST 497
  • MMES 400
  • AFST 697
  • ANTH 497
  • ANTH 697
  • ER&M 447
Migration and Transnationalism in the Muslim World

This seminar is an introduction in three respects: first, it provides an overview of the various experiences of mobility (and immobility) studied by ethnographers of migration and the issues or questions that emerge from these studies.

  • Leslie Gross-Wyrtzen
T 1:30-3:20p
  • GLBL 420
  • HLTH 490
Global Health Research Colloquium

This course is designed for Global Health Scholars in their senior year as they synthesize their academic studies and practical experiences during their time in the Global Health Studies MAP. In this weekly seminar, Global Health Scholars analyze central challenges in global health and discuss methodological approaches that have responded to these pressing global health concerns.

  • Catherine Panter-Brick
W 1:30-3:20p
  • GLBL 236
  • PLSC 182
The Politics of International Law and Cooperation

This course focuses on the political processes and institutions that facilitate cooperation among states. Students examine the obstacles to cooperation in the international arena, the reasons for the creation of international laws and institutions, and the extent to which such institutions actually affect state policy. Students also explore the tension between international cooperation and concerns about power, state sovereignty, and institutional legitimacy.

  • Tyler Pratt
TTh 9-10:15a
  • ARCH 327
  • URBN 327
Difference and the City

Four hundred and odd years after colonialism and racial capitalism brought twenty and odd people from Africa to the dispossessed indigenous land that would become the United States, the structures and systems that generate inequality and white supremacy persist. Our cities and their socioeconomic and built environments continue to exemplify difference. From housing and health to mobility and monuments, cities small and large, north and south, continue to demonstrate intractable disparities.

  • Justin Moore
HTBA
  • ANTH 441
  • WGSS 430
  • MMES 430
Gender and Citizenship in the Middle East

This seminar explores the gendered and ethnic-based social processes and forms of power that citizenship, statelessness, and migration crises fuel, and are fueled by, in the Middle East and North Africa.

  • Eda Pepi
W 1:30-3:20p
  • ECON 475
  • EP&E 286
Discrimination in Law, Theory, and Practice

How law and economic theory define and conceptualize economic discrimination; whether economic models adequately describe behaviors of discriminators as documented in court cases and government hearings; the extent to which economic theory and econometric techniques aid our understanding of actual marketplace discrimination.

Prerequisites: introductory microeconomics and at least one additional course in Economics, African American Studies, Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, or Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

  • Gerald Jaynes
T 9:25-11:15a
  • AMST 345
  • ER&M 409
  • WGSS 408
Latinx Ethnography

Consideration of ethnography within the genealogy and intellectual traditions of Latinx Studies. Topics include: questions of knowledge production and epistemological traditions in Latin America and U.S. Latino communities; conceptions of migration, transnationalism, and space; perspectives on “(il)legality” and criminalization; labor, wealth, and class identities; contextual understandings of gender and sexuality; theorizations of affect and intimate lives; and the politics of race and inequality under white liberalism and conservatism in the United States.

  • Ana Ramos-Zayas
Th 1:30-3:20p
  • AMST 439
  • ER&M 439
Fruits of Empire

Readings, discussions, and research on imperialism and “green gold” and their consequences for the imperial powers and their colonies and neo-colonies. Spatially conceived as a world-system that enmeshes the planet and as earth’s latitudes that divide the temperate from the tropical zones, imperialism as discourse and material relations is this seminar’s focus together with its implantations—an empire of plants.

  • Gary Okihiro
W 1:30-3:20p
  • FREN 233
Novels of the Twenty-First Century

The seminar examines the representation of upward mobility, social demotion, and interclass encounters in contemporary literature and cinema. Topics include emancipation and determinism; inequality, precarity, and class struggle; social mobility and migration; the interaction between social class and literary style; intersectionality; mixed couples; labor and the workplace; homecomings. We also discuss ways of approaching a contemporary corpus. Works by Angot, Eribon, Ernaux, Houellebecq, Linhart, Louis, NDiaye, Taïa.

  • Morgane Cadieu
Th 9:25-11:15a
  • AFAM 352
  • AMST 438
  • ER&M 291
  • LITR 295
  • WGSS 343
Caribbean Diasporic Literature

An examination of contemporary literature written by Caribbean writers who have migrated to, or who journey between, different countries around the Atlantic rim. Focus on literature written in English in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, both fiction and nonfiction. Writers include Caryl Phillips, Nalo Hopkinson, and Jamaica Kincaid.

  • Fadila Habchi
T 1:30-3:20p
  • ECON 467
  • GLBL 307
Economic Evolution of the Latin American and Caribbean Countries

Economic evolution and prospects of the Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries. Topics include the period from independence to the 1930s; import substitution and industrialization to the early 1980s; the debt crisis and the “lost decade”; reform and disappointment in the late 1980s and the 1990s; exploration of selected episodes in particular countries; and speculations about the future.

Prerequisities: intermediate microeconomics and macroeconomics.

  • Ernesto Zedillo
M 9:25-11:15a
  • GLBL 376
Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia in a historical and interdisciplinary context.  Topics include environmental studies, international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare.

  • Varies by section
T 3:30-5:20p
  • ER&M 080
Latinx Activism in the United States

This course examines the history of political mobilization among Latinx populations from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. As the students learn about different case studies of activism, the class introduces them to basic concepts and historical debates about human rights, social justice, cultural hegemony, decoloniality, and epistemologies of the global south. Each case study challenges the image of a passive Latinx population, and illustrates the continuing struggles for social change, social justice, and equality.

  • Ximena Lopez Carrillo
MW 9-10:15a
  • EVST 212
  • PLSC 212
  • EP&E 390
Democracy and Sustainability

Democracy, liberty, and the sustainable use of natural resources. Concepts include institutional analysis, democratic consent, property rights, market failure, and common pool resources. Topics of policy substance are related to human use of the environment and to U.S. and global political institutions.

  • Michael Fotos
Th 9:25-11:15a
  • AFAM 455
  • ER&M 438
  • EDST 340
Anti-Racist Curriculum and Pedagogy

This seminar explores the pedagogical and conceptual tools, resources and frameworks used to teach about race and racism at the primary and secondary levels, across diverse disciplines and subject areas. Moving beyond the more limited paradigms of racial colorblindness and diversity, the seminar introduces curricular strategies for centering race and racism in ways that are accessible to students from a broad range of backgrounds, and that work to advance the overall goals of the curriculum. 

  • Daniel HoSang
W 3:30-5:20p
  • ECON 449
  • EP&E 244
  • PLSC 374
The Economic Analysis of Conflict

In this course we apply microeconomic techniques, theoretical and empirical, to the analysis of internal violent conflict, including civil wars, terrorism and insurgencies, its causes and consequences. Topics include forced migration, ethnic conflict, long-term consequences of war and individual choices to participate in violence. Readings comprise frontier research papers and students will learn to critically engage with cutting-edge research designs.

  • Gerard Padro
W 9:25-11:15a
  • 30171-01
Advanced International Refugee Assistance Project

Advanced International Refugee Assistance Project (30171). 2 or 3 units. A fieldwork option.

  • Poellot
  • Prabhu
  • Majeed
Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
  • 30203-01
Advanced Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic Fieldwork

Advanced Legal Assistance Clinic: Immigrant Rights: Fieldwork (30203). 1 to 4 units. Open only to students who have completed Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. B. Haldeman.

Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

  • Haldeman
HTBA
  • 30174-01
Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic

Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30174). 1 to 4 units, depending on project workload. Open only to students who have completed the Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. J.J. Silk, H.R. Metcalf, and K. Beckerle.

  • Silk
  • Metcalf
  • Beckerle
Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
  • 30130-01 (Fieldwork)
  • 30129-01 (Seminar)
Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic

Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork (30130). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Students may elect to take the fieldwork section without enrolling in the advanced seminar section.Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M. Ahmad.

  • Ahmad
Wed 9:10 AM-10:00 AM
  • 20134-01
Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events

Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events (20134). 1 unit, credit/fail. Conducted in workshop format and led by Professor Paul Kahn, Co-Director of the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights, the course will examine contemporary issues in human rights practice and theory. Guest speakers, including scholars, advocates and journalists, will present each week on a diverse range of topics in human rights. Readings are generally distributed in advance of each session.

  • Kahn
  • Metcalf
  • Silk
Thu 12:10 PM-1:45 PM
  • 30195-01 (Fieldwork)
  • 30194-01 (Seminar)
Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic

Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Fieldwork (30195). 2 units. Students must enroll simultaneously in the seminar and fieldwork components of this clinic. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to six new students. B. Haldeman.

  • Haldeman
Wed 5:10 PM-7:00 PM
  • 30173-01
Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic

Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30173). 4 units. Students will work on a variety of human rights projects, generally in support of advocacy efforts of human rights organizations. Projects are designed to give students practical experience with the range of activities in which lawyers engage to promote respect for human rights; to help students build the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective human rights advocates; and to integrate the theory and practice of human rights.

  • Silk
  • Metcalf
  • Beckerle
Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM , Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
  • 30173-01
Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic

Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30173). 4 units. Students will work on a variety of human rights projects, generally in support of advocacy efforts of human rights organizations. Projects are designed to give students practical experience with the range of activities in which lawyers engage to promote respect for human rights; to help students build the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective human rights advocates; and to integrate the theory and practice of human rights.

  • Silk
  • Metcalf
  • Beckerle
Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM , Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
  • 20254-01
Regional Human Rights Protection: the Inter-American System

Regional Human Rights Protection: The Inter-American System (20254). 3 units. This course will provide an in-depth introduction to the doctrine and practice of the Inter-American Human Rights System (“IAHRS”). Students will examine the instruments that protect human rights in the IAHRS, the jurisprudence of the system, and the practice of the Inter-American Commission and Court of Human Rights.

  • Cavallaro
Wed 3:10 PM-6:00 PM