Course Listings

Spring 2022
Course number Course title Course description Course instructor Course date
  • ARCH 3297
From Shigeru Ban to Ikea: Designing Refugee Camps

Ever since the UN declared shelter a “human right” in 1951, the number of refugee camps has escalated. Across the globe, NGOs, humanitarian organizations, and architects have been involved in designing provisional housing for refugees—a term that covers peoples displaced by ethnic, political, economic, and environmental reasons, both within and beyond their countries. Initially designed as temporary solutions, many are now the size of cities, in some cases with populations that have soared to half a million people.

  • Esther da Costa Meyer
T 4-5:50p
  • PLSC 221
American Extremism

This course interrogates the rise of violent extremism in the United States from a political science perspective. The course draws from research on terrorism and political violence to explain current trends in extremism. We compare made-in-America ideologies like white nationalism and the “alt-right” to extremist movements abroad, from the Red Army Faction to the Islamic State. 

  • Nicholas Lotito
M 9:25-11:15a
  • GLBL 460
Turning Points in American Foreign Policy

Examination of American policy decisions and strategies from the founding of the republic to modern day. Topics include American engagement with France and Britain during the American Revolution; post-WWII construction of the modern international order; the breakdown of the Communist system; and the failed states in Yugoslavia and Syria; as well as America’s responses to the current challenges of modern world order, emerging multipolarism, and climate change.

  • Robert Ford
T 3:30-5:20p
  • ANTH 388
  • ANTH 588
Politics of Culture in Southeast Asia

The promotion of national culture as part of political and economic agendas in Southeast Asia. Cultural and political diversity as a method for maintaining a country’s cultural difference in a global world.

  • Erik Harms
Th 9:25-11:15a
  • GLBL 341
  • PLSC 450
The Geopolitics of Democracy

The threats to liberal democracy are being widely debated, from the US and Europe to developing nations.   In order for democracy to continue to thrive as the cornerstone of Western governance, it must adapt and be relevant to citizens of the 21st century. This course examines our appreciation of what constitutes democracy today and how to apply those understandings to the challenges of the 21st century.

  • Lauren Young
T 1:30-3:20p
  • AMST 452
  • ER&M 452
Movement, Memory, and U.S. Settler Colonialism

This research seminar examines and theorizes the significance of movement and mobility in the production and contestation of settler colonial nation-states. To do so, it brings together the fields of settler colonial studies, critical indigenous studies, ethnic studies, public history, and mobility studies.

  • Laura Barraclough
Th 9:25-11:15a
  • AMST 348
  • EVST 304
  • ER&M 381
Space, Place, and Landscape

Survey of core concepts in cultural geography and spatial theory. Ways in which the organization, use, and representation of physical spaces produce power dynamics related to colonialism, race, gender, class, and migrant status. Multiple meanings of home; the politics of place names; effects of tourism; the aesthetics and politics of map making; spatial strategies of conquest. Includes field projects in New Haven.

  • Laura Barraclough
Th 1:30-3:20p
  • HMRT 100
  • PLSC 148
Theories, Practices, and Politics of Human Rights

Introduction to core human-rights issues, ideas, practices, and controversies. The concept of human rights as a philosophical construct, a legal instrument, a political tool, an approach to economic and equity issues, a social agenda, and an international locus of contestation and legitimation. Required for students in the Multidisciplinary Academic Program in Human Rights.

  • Teeny Beckerle
TTh 2:30-3:20p
  • AMST 099
  • ER&M 089
  • HIST 059
  • PHYS 047
Asian Americans and STEM

As both objects of study and agents of discovery, Asian Americans have played an important yet often unseen role in fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in the U.S. Now more than ever, there is a need to rethink and educate students on science’s role in society and its interface with society. This course unites the humanities fields of Asian American history and American Studies with the STEM fields of medicine, physics, and computer science to explore the ways in which scientific practice has been shaped by U.S.

  • Mary Lui
  • Reina Maruyama
TTh 11:35a-12:50p
  • ECON 465
  • EP&E 224
  • GLBL 330
Debating Globalization

Facets of contemporary economic globalization, including trade, investment, and migration. Challenges and threats of globalization: inclusion and inequality, emerging global players, global governance, climate change, and nuclear weapons proliferation.

Prerequisite: background in international economics and data analysis. Preference to seniors majoring in Economics or EP&E.

  • Ernesto Zedillo
M 9:25-11:15a
  • PLSC 425
  • PLSC 759
  • GLBL 768
Democratization

This course examines why autocratic states democratize and why democracy breaks down in already democratic states. The course also examines the reasons for and the effectiveness of the different ways that governments resist democratization, including accommodation, censorship, and repression.

  • Dawn Brancati
M 3:30-5:20p
  • HMRT 470
Senior Independent Study

Readings in history, policy, theory, advocacy, and methodology of human rights; weekly tutorial and substantial term essay.

  • Jim Silk
HTBA
  • HMRT 460
Independent Study

Readings in history, policy, theory, advocacy, and methodology of human rights; weekly tutorial and substantial term essay. Open to sophomores, juniors, and those seniors not intending it to fulfill a senior requirement.

  • Jim Silk
HTBA
  • GLBL 341
  • PLSC 450
The Geopolitics of Democracy

The threats to liberal democracy are being widely debated, from the US and Europe to developing nations.   In order for democracy to continue to thrive as the cornerstone of Western governance, it must adapt and be relevant to citizens of the 21st century. This course examines our appreciation of what constitutes democracy today and how to apply those understandings to the challenges of the 21st century.

  • Lauren Young
T 1:30-3:20p
  • MMES 304
  • ANTH 344
  • PLSC 458
Modern North Africa in Flux

This advanced course overviews the politics, culture, and society of contemporary North Africa: Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and to a degree, Libya and Mauritania.

  • Vish Sakthivel
W 3:30-5:20p
  • ER&M 323
Documenting Refugees in New Haven

This hands-on mixed methods seminar explores the historical and contemporary experiences of refugees in New Haven. The course examines the historical contexts that have led to the resettlements of different refugee populations in New Haven as well as contemporary issues concerning these communities. Through workshops, students gain qualitative research skills by exploring oral history, archival research, and ethnographic participant observation as complementary methods to document and study refugee communities in New Haven.

  • Quan Tran
Th 9:25-11:15a
  • GLBL 288
  • PLSC 465
Civil-Military Relations

This course explores the role of the military in politics, with a focus on processes of democratization. It introduces students to concepts of civilian control, professionalization, and military intervention. The course introduces significant cases from twentieth-century history and surveys contemporary military politics. Topics include coups d’etat, responses to revolution, and democratic transition.

  • Nicholas Lotito
W 9:25-11:15a
  • GLBL 304
Four Conflicts: Iraq, Syria, Yemen, and Afghanistan

This course focuses on four recent conflicts—Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen—using human rights as a sustaining theme. The instructor uses her on-the-ground knowledge to delve into the roots of the conflicts; the specific battles; turning points; the case studies of human rights abuse; and finally, possible political solutions and post-conflict resolution. We use a mix of video footage from reputable journalists as well as testimonies, texts, and articles from the time. An important dimension is lessons learned from previous wars, and the diplomatic and international response.

  • Janine di Giovanni
T 1:30-3:20p
  • GLBL 773
Practical Challenges in Reform and Reconstruction

This course addresses practical challenges in countries, cities, and regions undertaking policy design and reform, especially at post-disaster and post-conflict junctures. With the current context of the pandemic, imperatives for climate change and inclusive governance, and ongoing challenges of conflict, criminality, and state collapse, governments and international institutions are struggling to respond and find the right policies for recovery and resilience. The course provides a range of perspectives on approaches to policy reform and implementation.

  • Clare Lockhart
T 1:30pm-3:20pm in WTS B35
  • 30128-01 (Fieldwork)
  • 30127-01 (Seminar)
Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic

Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic (30127) and Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). Students will represent immigrants and low-wage workers in Connecticut in labor, immigration, and other civil rights areas, through litigation for individuals and non-litigation advocacy for community-based organizations. In litigation matters, students will handle cases at all stages of legal proceedings in Immigration Court, Board of Immigration Appeals, U.S. District Court, the Second Circuit, and state courts.

  • Ahmad Wishnie
  • Zampierin Flores
TBC (Fieldwork), Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM (Seminar)
  • 30195-01 (Fieldwork)
  • 30194-01 (Seminar)
Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic
Fieldwork (30195). 2 units. Students must enroll simultaneously in the seminar and fieldwork components of this clinic. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to six new students. D. Blank and B. Haldeman.
 
Seminar (30194) and Fieldwork (30195). 2 units, for each component, 4 units total. Students may elect credit/fail and must do so by the stated deadline each term. Students must be enrolled in the seminar and fieldwork components simultaneously.
  • Blank Haldeman
TBC
  • 21193-01
Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events

Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events (21193). 1 unit, credit/fail. Conducted in workshop format and led by Professor James Silk, Director of the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights, the course will examine contemporary issues in human rights practice and theory. Guest speakers, including scholars, advocates and journalists, will present each week on a diverse range of topics in human rights. Readings are generally distributed in advance of each session.

  • Silk
  • Metcalf
Thu 12:10 PM-1:45 PM
  • 30130-01 (Fieldwork)
  • 30129-01 (Seminar)
Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic
Fieldwork (30130). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Students may elect to take the fieldwork section without enrolling in the advanced seminar section.
 
Seminar (30129). 1 unit, credit/fail. A weekly seminar session only for returning students. Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork is a co-requisite. Students enrolled in the seminar section must also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.
  • Ahmad Wishnie
  • Zampierin Flores
TBC (Fieldwork), Wed 9:10 AM-10:00 AM (Seminar)
  • 30173-01
  • 30174-01 (Advanced)
Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30173). 4 units. Students will work on a variety of human rights projects, generally in support of advocacy efforts of human rights organizations. Projects are designed to give students practical experience with the range of activities in which lawyers engage to promote respect for human rights; to help students build the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective human rights advocates; and to integrate the theory and practice of human rights.
  • Silk
  • Metcalf
  • Beckerle Flores
Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM, Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM (Advanced)
  • 30203-01 (Fieldwork)
  • 30192-01 (Seminar)
Advanced Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic Fieldwork
Fieldwork (30203). 1 to 4 units. Open only to students who have completed Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic. 
 
Seminar (30192). 1 unit, credit/fail. Open only to students who have completed Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Fieldwork and Seminar. Students who are enrolled in the seminar must also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.
  • Blank Haldeman
TBC
  • 30170-01
  • 30171-01 (Advanced)
International Refugee Assistance Project
This course is designed to give students an opportunity to learn about international refugee law in theory and in practice. Students enrolled in the seminar will work under the supervision of attorneys to assist persecuted individuals abroad seeking safe legal passage to the United States or another country through client assistance, research, or advocacy projects. The course will provide the students with the practical and theoretical knowledge necessary to be effective practitioners of international refugee law. 
 
  • Kornfeld Poellot
Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM, TBC (Advanced)
  • GMAN 319
  • GMAN 679
  • FILM 694
  • HUMS 379
  • LITR 357
  • CPLT 528
  • FILM 361
Media of Migration

What role do media play in current debates on transnational migration? How do the stories they tell shape our imagination of refugees’ journeys starting in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia? Against the backdrop of European colonialism, post-1945 labor migration, and the so-called “European Refugee Crisis” in 2015, this course analyzes media representations of migration to Europe in the 21st century. We explore representations of migration due to political conflict, global economic inequality, and climate change.

  • Jette Gindner
Th 3:30-5:20p
  • HIST 381
  • MMES 102
  • NELC 102
  • SOCY 102
Introduction to the Middle East

Introduction to the history, politics, societies, and cultures of the Middle East. Topics and themes include geopolitics, environment, state formation, roles of Judaism/Christianity/Islam, empire&colonialism, nationalism, regional & global wars, Palestine-Israel conflict, US and other Great Power intervention.

  • Jonathan Wyrtzen
MW 2:30-3:45p
  • GLBL 322
  • MMES 310
Society and Politics of the Middle East

This introductory survey seminar has an emphasis on cultural anthropology. Its aim is to explore the region from an ethnographic perspective. Students gain both a grounding in key themes and texts, as well as an understanding of the wider issues as they pertain to a very diverse region of the world grouped under the concept of the “Middle East.” We cover some of the most pertinent thematic areas, such as the aftermath of colonialism, the nature of states and nationalism, the role of religion in the diverse societies of the Middle East, gender and sexuality, and media.

  • Elizabeth Berk
T 9:25-11:15a
  • GLBL 292
  • MMES 295
Middle East Foreign and Regional Policies

The course presents MENA states’ foreign policies within the context of their evolving political and regional constraints as well as taking into consideration their mutual rivalries. The course focuses on the foreign policies of some states from both North Africa and the Middle East.

  • Nizar Messari
W 3:30-5:20p
  • ANTH 321
  • MMES 321
  • SOCY 318
  • WGSS 321
Middle East Gender Studies

The lives of women and men in the contemporary Middle East explored through a series of anthropological studies and documentary films. Competing discourses surrounding gender and politics, and the relation of such discourse to actual practices of everyday life. Feminism, Islamism, activism, and human rights; fertility, family, marriage, and sexuality.

  • Marcia Inhorn
M 3:30-5:20p
  • AFAM 305
  • ENGL 258
African American Autobiography

Examination of African American autobiography, from slave narratives to contemporary memoirs, and how the genre approaches the project (and problem) of knowing, through reading, the relationships of fellow humans. Chronological consideration of a range of narratives and their representations of race, of space, of migration, of violence, of self, and of other, as well as the historical circumstances that inform these representations.

  • Sarah Mahurin
MW 11:35a-12:50p
  • ER&M 351
Southeast Asian Refugee Histories and Experiences

This multi-disciplinary seminar explores the historical and contemporary experiences of Southeast Asian refugees living in the United States. The course examines the historical contexts that created Southeast Asian refugee diasporas and community formations in the US as well as contemporary social, political, cultural, and economic issues concerning these communities.

  • Quan Tran
T 9:25-11:15a
Fall 2021
Course number Course title Course description Course instructor Course date
  • ECON 475
  • EP&E 286
Discrimination in Law, Theory, and Practice

How law and economic theory define and conceptualize economic discrimination; whether economic models adequately describe behaviors of discriminators as documented in court cases and government hearings; the extent to which economic theory and econometric techniques aid our understanding of actual marketplace discrimination.

Prerequisites: introductory microeconomics and at least one additional course in Economics, African American Studies, Ethnicity, Race, and Migration, or Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

  • Gerald Jaynes
T 9:25am-11:15am
  • 30173-01
Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic

Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30173). 4 units. Students will work on a variety of human rights projects, generally in support of advocacy efforts of human rights organizations. Projects are designed to give students practical experience with the range of activities in which lawyers engage to promote respect for human rights; to help students build the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective human rights advocates; and to integrate the theory and practice of human rights.

  • James J. Silk
  • Hope R. Metcalf
  • Kristine Beckerle
Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM, Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
  • FREN 958
  • WGSS 783
Social Mobility Today

The seminar examines the representation of upward mobility, social demotion, and interclass encounters in contemporary literature and cinema. Topics include emancipation and determinism; inequality, precarity, and class struggle; social mobility and migration; the interaction between social class and literary style; intersectionality; mixed couples; labor and the workplace; homecomings. We also discuss ways of approaching a contemporary corpus. Works by Angot, Eribon, Ernaux, Houellebecq, Linhart, Louis, NDiaye, Taïa.

  • Morgane Cadieu
Th 9:25am-11:15am
  • AFST 175
Africa in International Relations

This course examines key facets of how African countries interact with the rest of the world, and with other countries on the continent. Focusing mostly on Sub-Saharan African countries, it looks at international economic relations (focusing on aid but also addressing trade, investment, and debt); peacemaking and peacebuilding; and regional governance institutions.

  • David Simon
T & Th 1pm-2:15pm
  • AFAM 196
  • AMST 196
  • SOCY 190
  • EVST 196
  • ER&M 226
Race, Class, and Gender in American Cities

Examination of how racial, gender, and class inequalities have been built, sustained, and challenged in American cities. Focus on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Topics include industrialization and deindustrialization, segregation, gendered public/private split, gentrification, transit equity, environmental justice, food access, and the relationships between public space, democracy, and community wellbeing. Includes field projects in New Haven.

  • Laura Barraclough
M & W 10:30am-11:20am
  • HIST 311J
  • MMES 303
Social Movements in the Modern Middle East and North Africa

How have social movements and grassroots networks shaped politics, culture, and day-to-day realities in the contemporary Middle East and North Africa (MENA)? This seminar addresses such driving questions by way of readings and discussion on a range of movements and ideological currents in the MENA region from the late nineteenth century to present, including labor, socialism, feminism, Islamism, Third Worldism, and nationalism in its various forms.

  • Hamzah Baig
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • PLSC 123
Political Economy of Foreign Aid

Introduction to modern quantitative research methods in international political economy, with a focus on empirical evidence related to foreign aid. The state of knowledge regarding the effects of development assistance on democratization, governance, human rights, and conflict. The challenges of drawing causal inferences in the domain of international political economy.

  • Peter Aronow
W 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • GLBL 236
  • PLSC 182
The Politics of International Law and Cooperation

This course focuses on the political processes and institutions that facilitate cooperation among states. Students examine the obstacles to cooperation in the international arena, the reasons for the creation of international laws and institutions, and the extent to which such institutions actually affect state policy. Students also explore the tension between international cooperation and concerns about power, state sovereignty, and institutional legitimacy.

  • Tyler Pratt
T & Th 4:30pm-5:20pm
  • HMRT 400
Advanced Human Rights Colloquium

This course is the culminating seminar for Yale College seniors in the Multidisciplinary Academic Program in Human Rights (Human Rights Scholars). The goal of the colloquium is to help students conceive and produce a meaningful capstone project as a culmination of their work in the program. It is a singular opportunity for students to pursue in-depth research in human rights.

  • Jim Silk
W 6:30pm-8:20pm
  • ANTH 386
  • GLBL 393
Humanitarian Interventions: Ethics, Politics, and Health

Analysis of humanitarian interventions from a variety of social science disciplinary perspectives. Issues related to policy, legal protection, health care, morality, and governance in relation to the moral imperative to save lives in conditions of extreme adversity. Promotion of dialogue between social scientists and humanitarian practitioners.

  • Catherine Panter-Brick
  • Sigridur Benediktsdottir
W 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • ARCH 327
  • URBN 327
  • ARCH 4247
Difference and the City

Four hundred and odd years after colonialism and racial capitalism brought twenty and odd people from Africa to the dispossessed indigenous land that would become the United States, the structures and systems that generate inequality and white supremacy persist. Our cities and their socioeconomic and built environments continue to exemplify difference. From housing and health to mobility and monuments, cities small and large, north and south, continue to demonstrate intractable disparities.

  • Justin Moore
F 9am-10:50am
  • ANTH 441
  • WGSS 430
  • MMES 430
  • MMES 399
Gender and Citizenship in the Middle East

This seminar explores the gendered and ethnic-based social processes and forms of power that citizenship, statelessness, and migration crises fuel, and are fueled by, in the Middle East and North Africa.

  • Eda Pepi
W 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • ANTH 414
  • ANTH 575
  • EAST 417
Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.

  • Helen Siu
T 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • AMST 345
  • AMST 775
  • WGSS 613
  • ANTH 612
  • ER&M 409
  • WGSS 408
Latinx Ethnography

Consideration of ethnography within the genealogy and intellectual traditions of Latinx Studies. Topics include: questions of knowledge production and epistemological traditions in Latin America and U.S. Latino communities; conceptions of migration, transnationalism, and space; perspectives on “(il)legality” and criminalization; labor, wealth, and class identities; contextual understandings of gender and sexuality; theorizations of affect and intimate lives; and the politics of race and inequality under white liberalism and conservatism in the United States.

  • Ana Ramos-Zayas
Th 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • AMST 301
  • ER&M 382
  • HIST 325J
Researching Mexican American Histories

A survey of recent scholarship on Mexican American history. Students write a research paper based on primary sources and explore issues related to migration, education, detention, religion, urban communities, ethnic politics, and youth activism since the mid-nineteenth century.

  • Stephen Pitti
W 3:30pm-5:20pm
  • AMST 272
  • WGSS 272
  • HIST 183
  • ER&M 282
Asian American History, 1800 to the Present

An introduction to the history of East, South, and Southeast Asian migrations and settlement to the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present. Major themes include labor migration, community formation, U.S. imperialism, legal exclusion, racial segregation, gender and sexuality, cultural representations, and political resistance.

  • Mary Lui
M & W 11:35am-12:25pm
  • AMST 439
  • ER&M 439
Fruits of Empire
Readings, discussions, and research on imperialism and “green gold” and their consequences for the imperial powers and their colonies and neo-colonies. Spatially conceived as a world-system that enmeshes the planet and as earth’s latitudes that divide the temperate from the tropical zones, imperialism as discourse and material relations is this seminar’s focus together with its implantations—an empire of plants.
  • Gary Okihiro
W 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • ER&M 200
Introduction to Ethnicity, Race, and Migration

Historical roots of contemporary ethnic and racial formations and competing theories of ethnicity, race, and migration. Cultural constructions and social practices of race, ethnicity, and migration in the United States and around the world.

  • Alicia Schmidt Camacho
T & Th 11:35am-12:50pm
  • ECON 467
  • GLBL 307
Economic Evolution of the Latin American and Caribbean Countries

Facets of contemporary economic globalization, including trade, investment, and migration. Challenges and threats of globalization: inclusion and inequality, emerging global players, global governance, climate change, and nuclear weapons proliferation.

  • Ernesto Zedillo
M 9:25am-11:15am
  • AMST 622
  • CPLT 622
Working Group on Globalization and Culture

A continuing yearlong collective research project, a cultural studies “laboratory.” The group, drawing on several disciplines, meets regularly to discuss common readings, develop collective and individual research projects, and present that research publicly.

  • Michael Denning
M 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • REL 935
Theologizing Immigration: Latinxs and the Catholic Tradition

National politics and the COVID-19 pandemic have led to policies and rhetoric that limit human mobility to the United States and impose significant harms on migration at the U.S. southern border. What do migration experts and Latinx theologians say about the current moment? How do Latinx biblical and theological scholars engage critically and imaginatively the issues of human mobility, through biblical and theological reflection on current immigration realities?

  • Francisco Lozada
T 3:30pm-5:20pm
  • GLBL 505
Environmental Security in the Middle East

This course examines how environmental, water, food, energy, and climate change have increasingly become linked to human and national security in the Middle East. It begins by exploring the state of the environment in the region and how the policies of the Middle East governments have led to serious environmental degradation and subsequent loss of jobs, migration, social tension, violence, and regional conflicts. Drawing on an in-depth analysis of contemporary case/country studies, students learn how these problems can serve as major human and national security threats.

  • TBC
HTBA
  • GLBL 719
Turning Points in Peace-Building

This course examines the myriad challenges that must be addressed when the fighting has stopped. Once a peace agreement is signed, the real deal-making begins. Former rebels negotiate with their military commanders about relinquishing arms and working for a living; communities look for “peace dividends”; refugees weigh options to return home; governments try to assert authority despite their new role or how weakened they have become; and compatriots who opposed the peace settlement relentlessly try to undermine it.

  • Bisa Williams
F 9:25am-11:15am
  • PLSC 746
The Economics and Politics of Migration

This course provides an introduction to contemporary social science research on immigration and emigration. Key questions we examine include: (1) Why do people migrate (or not)? Who migrates and why? Where do people migrate? (2) What are the consequences of migration for migrants and for the broader economy/society? for politics? (3) What is the relationship between migration and conflict? (4) How do different types of migration (for example, female vs. male migration, high-skill vs. low-skill migration, refugee flows vs. “economic” migrants, internal vs.

  • Emily Sellars
M 9:25am-11:15am
  • 30194-01 (Seminar)
  • 30195-01 (Fieldwork)
  • 30203-01 (Fieldwork; Advanced)
Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Seminar

New Haven Legal Assistance is a historic non-profit civil legal services office with a robust immigration practice. Under the supervision of attorneys at New Haven Legal Assistance, students in the New Haven Legal Assistance Immigrant Rights Clinic (IRC) have represented noncitizens in defensive removal proceedings before the immigration court, in appeals before the Board of Immigration Appeals, and in petitions for review before the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

  • Diana Blank
  • Benjamin M. Haldeman
HTBA
  • 30127-01 (Seminar)
  • 30129-01 (Seminar; Advanced)
  • 30130-01 (Fieldwork)
Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Seminar

Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic (30127) and Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). Students will represent immigrants and low-wage workers in Connecticut in labor, immigration, and other civil rights areas, through litigation for individuals and non-litigation advocacy for community-based organizations. In litigation matters, students will handle cases at all stages of legal proceedings in Immigration Court, Board of Immigration Appeals, U.S. District Court, the Second Circuit, and state courts.

  • Michael J. Wishnie
  • Marisol Orihuela
  • Sara Zampierin
Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
  • 20611-01
Immigration Law

Immigration Law (20611). 4 units. This survey of immigration law and policy explores several broad and complex questions: Who is a citizen of the United States and what does citizenship mean? What are the criteria and processes for noncitizens to come to the United States on a temporary or permanent basis? Under what circumstances may noncitizens be forced to leave the United States? Which actors and institutions have authority to establish, administer, and enforce rules concerning immigration and citizenship? What substantive and procedural rights do noncitizens have?

  • Anil Kalhan
Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM , Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
  • 20547-01
Immigration Law

Immigration Law (20547). 3 units. This survey course will provide a foundation in the basics of the immigration law system, the policy choices it reflects, and the constitutional principles governing the regulation and rights of non-citizens. The course will then explore various topical legal and policy issues related to immigrants’ rights and immigration reform as well as the normative values informing contemporary treatment of documented and undocumented immigrants.

  • Lucas Guttentag
Tue 2:10 PM-3:35 PM , Thu 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
  • 30171-01
Advanced International Refugee Assistance Project

Advanced International Refugee Assistance Project (30171). 2 or 3 units. A fieldwork option. Students may enroll for 2 units (the default) for fieldwork only without a seminar and not for experiential credit or for 3 units with a required seminar and experiential credit. Prerequisite: International Refugee Assistance Project. Open only to JD students. Permission of the instructors required. S. Poellot and J.M. Kornfeld.

  • Julie M. Kornfeld
  • Stephen T. Poellot
HTBA
  • AFAM 352
  • AMST 438
  • ER&M 291
  • LITR 295
  • WGSS 343
Caribbean Diasporic Literature

An examination of contemporary literature written by Caribbean writers who have migrated to, or who journey between, different countries around the Atlantic rim. Focus on literature written in English in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, both fiction and nonfiction. Writers include Caryl Phillips, Nalo Hopkinson, and Jamaica Kincaid.

  • Fadila Habchi
T 1:30pm-3:20pm
  • PLSC 464
Immigration, Integration, and Multiculturalism in the West

Do immigrants integrate? What determines the attitudes of native-born communities toward immigrants? Are immigrants good or bad for local economies? Does the presence of immigrants fuel far-right movements? Which policy tools encourage integration, and which can spur backlash? These are some of the questions we investigate together by reviewing the evidence base on immigration, integration, and multiculturalism.

  • Salma Mousa
TTh 11:35am-12:25pm
  • MMES 121
  • PLSC 121
International Relations of the Middle East

This course explores the multiple causes of insecurity in the Middle East and North Africa, a region of paramount geostrategic interest, whose populations have suffered from armed conflicts both within and across national borders. The first half of the course interrogates traditional security concepts like war, terrorism, and revolution, as well as the political, economic, and social contexts which give rise to these phenomena. The course then turns to foreign policy analysis in case studies of the region’s major states.

  • Nicholas Lotito
M & W 10:30am-11:20am
  • PLSC 188
  • GLBL 275
Approaches to International Security

Introduction to major approaches and central topics in the field of international security, with primary focus on the principal man-made threats to human security: the use of violence among and within states, both by state and non-state actors.

  • Dawn Brancati
M & W 2:30pm-3:45pm
  • AFAM 459
  • ER&M 402
  • AMST 479
The Displaced: Migrant and Refugee Narratives of the 20th and 21st Centuries
This course examines a series of transnational literary texts and films that illuminate how the displaced—migrants, exiles, and refugees— remake home away from their native countries. The twentieth and twenty-first centuries have produced massive displacements due to wars, genocides, racial, ethnic and religious conflicts, economic and climate change, among other factors.
  • Leah Mirakhor
T 1:30pm-3:20pm