Courses

Fall 2020Spring 2020

Fall 2020

COURSE NUMBER

TITLE

DESCRIPTION

NAME OF FACULTY

TIME AND DAYS

HIST 363J

SAST 334

ER&M 433

Mobile South Asians and the Global Legal Order

South Asians make up the largest population of overseas migrants in the world, close to 33 million in 2017 and a diaspora that is almost double that number. This course looks at the unprecedented mobility of South Asians from the mid-19th century until now as merchants, indentured labor, students, pilgrims, professionals, domestic workers, political exiles, refugees, and economic migrants, through the lens of state attempts to control movement and individual resistance, subversion, and adaptation to such controls. Focusing on the legal consciousness of South Asian migrants and the emergence of South Asian nations as political players on the global stage, this class traces how South Asian mobility led to the forging of a new global order, over migration, multiculturalism, Islamic law, civil liberties, labor law, and international law.

Rohit De

T

9:25-11:15am

Online

CLSS 856

HIST 506

MDVL 506

Human Migration in Antiquity

This course examines the processes of human migration in premodern societies with an emphasis on ancient Rome. It explores voluntary and forced migrations, their motivations, processes, and outcomes. Particular attention is paid to sources and problems in the period of late antiquity, when human migration helped drive the collapse of the Roman Empire.

Noel Lenski

M

3:30-6pm

* LC 317

AFAM 011

ENGL 007

Literature of the Black South

This course examines the enduring and often unanticipated connections between African American and Southern literature, and considers the ways in which the American South remains a space that simultaneously represents and repels an African American ethos. Through topics and lenses as varied as the Black church, the Great Migration, the Civil Rights Movement, and the rural/urban divide, we consider the ways in which Black culture and Southern culture continue to intersect and interact—even when the natal (Southern) place has ostensibly been rejected or abandoned.

Sarah Mahurin

MW

11:35-12:50pm

Online

EVST 305

MMES 305

GLBL 301

GLBL 505

Environmental Security in the Middle East

This course overviews how environmental, water, food, energy, and climate change have increasingly become linked to human and national security in the Middle East. It begins by exploring the state of the environment in the region and how the policies of the Middle East governments have lead to serious environmental degradation and subsequent loss of jobs, migration, social tension, violence, and regional conflicts. Drawing on an in-depth analysis of contemporary case/country studies, students learn how these problems can serve as major human and national security threats.

Kaveh Madani

W

1:30-3:20pm

Online

ANTH 244

Social Change in Contemporary Southeast Asia

This course examines a number of significant forms of social change occurring in Southeast Asia in recent years. Fueled by new digital technologies; environmental change; globalized economies, politics, human rights, and religion—Southeast Asia is experiencing a rapid transformation. Some of these changes are visible such as the ubiquitous use of mobile phones, transformed city skylines, rampant deforestation, and changing infrastructure. However, some are less visible such as the forced evacuations of the poor from urban centers, increasing state surveillance, and new forms of relationships between people and places enabled through digital communications. Topics include migration, politics and political activism, urban development, environmentalism, labor, violence, religion, popular culture, gender, and relationships. Principle readings include key works from a range of disciplines and represent a number of Southeast Asian nations. The course includes a visual component through a number of in class film screenings.

Erik Harms

TTh

9-10:15am

Online

WGSS 325

ER&M 324

Asian Diasporas since 1800

Examination of the diverse historical and contemporary experiences of people from East, South, and Southeast Asian ancestry living in the Americas, Australia, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Europe. Organized thematically and comparative in scope, topics include labor migrations, community formations, chain migrations, transnational connections, intergenerational dynamics, interracial and ethnic relations, popular cultures, and return migrations.

Quan Tran

W

1:30-3:20pm

Online

ER&M 381

AMST 348

EVST 304

Space, Place, and Landscape

Survey of core concepts in cultural geography and spatial theory. Ways in which the organization, use, and representation of physical spaces produce power dynamics related to colonialism, race, gender, class, and migrant status. Multiple meanings of home; the politics of place names; effects of tourism; the aesthetics and politics of map making; spatial strategies of conquest. Includes field projects in New Haven.

Laura Barraclough

W

3:30-5:20pm

Online

MMES 271

GLBL 271

GLBL 713

Middle East Politics

Exploration of the international politics of the Middle East through a framework of analysis that is partly historical and partly thematic. How the international system, as well as social structures and political economy, shape state behavior. Consideration of Arab nationalism; Islamism; the impact of oil; Cold War politics; conflicts; liberalization; the Arab-spring, and the rise of the Islamic State.

Emma Sky

T

3:30-5:20pm

Online

GLBL 101

Gateway to Global Affairs

Collaboration between faculty and practitioners to discuss key topics and themes related to diplomacy, development, and defense.

Emma Sky

TTh

1:00-2:15pm

Online

GLBL 646

Four Conflicts through a Human Rights Lens

This course focuses on four conflicts of the 1990s—Bosnia, Sierra Leone, Rwanda, and Kosovo—specifically through the lens of human rights, which are all linked by a common theme: humanitarian intervention. In some cases, it went horribly wrong, Rwanda and Bosnia being prime examples. In other cases—Sierra Leone—the wars were able to end. The 1990s was the era of supposed “humanitarian intervention” and “just” wars, when doctrines such as “The Blair Doctrine” presided and were used to save civilian lives. Can we learn from what happened in that decade given the horror of Syria, Yemen, Afghanistan, and Iraq today? The course uses a mix of video footage from the wars from reputable journalists as well as testimonies, texts, and articles from the time. Students also examine the 1990s conflicts under the Right to Protect doctrine of Kofi Annan and compare how humanitarian intervention was used then—as opposed to now, in the case of the Syrian war. An important dimension of the course is lessons learned. The Blair Doctrine is examined. There are several guest speakers throughout the term who were directly involved in these conflicts.

Janine di Giovanni

F

12:30-2:20pm

*HLH55

MMES 121

PLSC 121

International Relations of the Middle East

This course explores the multiple causes of insecurity in the Middle East and North Africa, a region of paramount geostrategic interest, whose populations have suffered from armed conflicts both within and across national borders. The first half of the course interrogates traditional security concepts like war, terrorism, and revolution, as well as the political, economic, and social contexts which give rise to these phenomena. The course then turns to foreign policy analysis in case studies of the region’s major states. Previous coursework in international relations and/or Middle East politics or history recommended but not required.

Nicholas Lotito

MW

1:30-2:20pm

Online 

HIST 380

MMES 379

The Making of the Modern Middle East, 1800-1980

This course surveys the history of the modern Middle East from the start of the 19th century through the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran. Importantly, the course problematizes the idea of ‘modernity’ in our historical understanding of the region. Using as a general framework the transition from empire to nation-state, it explores several key themes including discourses and practices of colonialism across the region, the creation of ethno-national, sectarian, and religious identities, social and political upheavals wrought by revolts, rebellions, and new state formations, the changing nature of economies and labor, the rise of authoritarian leadership, the ideological spread of Arab socialism, anti-colonialism, pan-Islamism, and other political and social byproducts and consequences of the creation of ‘modern’ states. Each week we cover the ways these themes impacted the wider Middle East and North Africa. The readings and lectures encourage students to critically examine the historical explanations, definitions, and arguments regarding the impact or the non-impact of modernity as the driving force for transformations and stagnations in society, culture, politics, and state-formation across the Middle East and North Africa. Class materials include a range of primary source materials and documents in English and in translation, secondary sources, and podcasts.

Kevin Gledhill

MW

2:30-3:20pm

Online

HIST 980

Genocide in History and Theory

Comparative research and analysis of genocidal occurrences around the world from ancient times to the present; theories and case studies; an interregional, interdisciplinary perspective. Readings and discussion, guest speakers, research paper.

Ben Kiernan

Th

1:30-3:20pm

Online

PLSC 942

Political Violence and Its Legacies Workshop

The MacMillan Political Violence and Its Legacies (PVL) workshop is an interdisciplinary forum for work in progress by Yale faculty and graduate students, as well as scholars from other universities. PVL is designed to foster a wide-ranging conversation at Yale and beyond about political violence and its effects that transcends narrow disciplinary and methodological divisions. The workshop’s interdisciplinary nature attracts faculty and graduate students from Anthropology, African American Studies, American Studies, History, Sociology, and Political Science, among others. There are no formal presentations. Papers are distributed one week prior to the workshop and are read in advance by attendees. A discussant introduces the manuscript and raises questions for the subsequent discussion period. To help facilitate a lively and productive discussion, we ban laptops and cellphones for the workshop’s duration. If you are affiliated with Yale University and would like to join the mailing list, please send an e-mail to julia.bleckner@yale.edu with “PVL Subscribe” in the subject line.

Elisabeth Wood

HTBA

Online

AMST 622

CPLT 622

Working Group on Globalization and Culture

A continuing yearlong collective research project, a cultural studies “laboratory.” The group, drawing on several disciplines, meets regularly to discuss common readings, develop collective and individual research projects, and present that research publicly. The general theme for the working group is globalization and culture, with three principal aspects: (1) the globalization of cultural industries and goods, and its consequences for patterns of everyday life as well as for forms of fiction, film, broadcasting, and music; (2) the trajectories of social movements and their relation to patterns of migration, the rise of global cities, the transformation of labor processes, and forms of ethnic, class, and gender conflict; (3) the emergence of and debates within transnational social and cultural theory. The specific focus, projects, and directions of the working group are determined by the interests, expertise, and ambitions of the members of the group, and change as its members change.

Michael Denning

M

1:30-3:20pm

Online

GLBL 740

The Western Hemisphere: Designing a Transnational Policy Agenda

This course explores four critical public policy issues and societal challenges confronting the Western Hemisphere region: inequality, corruption, migration, and race, gender, and sexuality. Governments must rethink their priorities. Citizens are seeking greater accountability from political leaders. All of these issues transcend national boundaries. What does a proactive transnational policy agenda for the region look like? How can national leaders restore the credibility of democratic governance and create new economic opportunities? What, if any, role could the U.S. government and international institutions play in supporting initiatives in these areas?

Francisco Palmieri

W

7:00-8:50pm

*HLH55

HMRT 400

Advanced Human Rights Colloquium

This course is the culminating seminar for Yale College seniors in the Multidisciplinary Academic Program in Human Rights (Human Rights Scholars). The goal of the colloquium is to help students conceive and produce a meaningful capstone project as a culmination of their work in the program. It is a singular opportunity for students to pursue in-depth research in human rights.

Jim Silk

HTBA

Online

ANTH 386

GLBL 393

Humanitarian Interventions: Ethics, Politics, and Health

Analysis of humanitarian interventions from a variety of social science disciplinary perspectives. Issues related to policy, legal protection, health care, morality, and governance in relation to the moral imperative to save lives in conditions of extreme adversity. Promotion of dialogue between social scientists and humanitarian practitioners.

Catherine Panter-Brick

W

1:30-3:20pm

Online

GLBL 366

Politics of Global Health

Interest in and attention to global health has expanded considerably in recent years. Public and private sector investments in solving global health challenges are increasing. Many of the challenges to solving global health problems though are not only in the resources required to close existing gaps. Politics, policy and power are dominant in the global health sphere. Understanding these dynamics is essential to helping to tackle the world’s greatest global health challenges. This course examines the intricate and diverse politics of global health and how they shape our inclination, ability, and direction of response to global health challenges. We explore the historical and current day power dynamics affecting health burdens, and which actually have effects on the health system’s ability to care for a population. We explore the principle actors in the global health space, and how they are governed. Discussions also consider how health intersects with economics, national security, the law and regulation, climate change and conflict. Finally we explore the power dynamics within “ourselves” and how health is valued on a personal level through examination of specific countries health systems; we explore how countries have embraced health as a right (or not)  and designed their health systems to care for their complete populations (or not).

Vanessa Kerry

T

1:30-3:20pm

Online

GMAN 208

HIST 254

Germany from Unification to Refugee Crisis

The history of Germany from its unification in 1871 through the present. Topics include German nationalism and national unification; the culture and politics of the Weimar Republic; National Socialism and the Holocaust; the division of Germany and the Cold War; the Student Movement and New Social Movements; reunification; and Germany’s place in contemporary Europe.

Jennifer Allen

MW

11:35-12:50pm

Online

LAW 20118

PLSC 300

EP&E 354

PLSC 623

Rethinking the Political Enlightenment

Rethinking the Political Enlightenment: Seminar (20118). 2 units.The calamities wrought by Fascism and Nazism, together with growing disillusionment at the excesses and direction of Soviet communism and then Mao’s China, led many postwar intellectuals to rethink the Enlightenment’s promise. In politics that promise had centered on the creation of durable political institutions based on scientific principles that would foster, expand, and protect human freedom. We will study the ways in which the harsh realities of twentieth century politics led political theorists to modify, recast, and in some cases reject these Enlightenment aspirations, and we will evaluate those responses from the perspective of our contemporary politics. Readings will be drawn from, among others, Jonathan Israel, James Tully, George Orwell, Hannah Arendt, Herbert Marcuse, Nicos Poulantzas, Jürgen Habermas, Leo Strauss, Isaiah Berlin, Michel Foucault, Richard Rorty, Alasdair MacIntyre, Charles Taylor, Anthony Appiah, Nancy Fraser, Carole Pateman, Katherine MacKinnon, Judith Butler, Uday Mehta, Charles Mills, Judith Shklar, Quentin Skinner, J.G.A. Pocock, Michael Walzer, and Iris Marion Young. Among the themes discussed will be the connections between Enlightenment aspirations and the ideas of modernization, progress, and democracy; the advantages and limitations of periodization in the study of political theory; teleological conceptions of history; and the role of truth in political argument.

Ian Shapiro

M

1:30-3:20pm

Online

PLSC 116

Comparative Politics: States, Regimes, and Conflict

Introduction to the study of politics and political life in the world outside the United States. State formation and nationalism, the causes and consequences of democracy, the functioning of authoritarian regimes, social movements and collective action, and violence.

Sarah Khan

TTh

11:35-12:25pm

Online

SBS 585

GLBL 529

WGSS 529

Sexuality, Gender, Health, and Human Rights

This course explores the application of human rights perspectives and practices to issues in regard to sexuality, gender, and health. Through reading, interactive discussion, paper presentation, and occasional outside speakers, students learn the tools and implications of applying rights and law to a range of sexuality and health-related topics. The overall goal is twofold: to engage students in the world of global sexual health and rights policy making as a field of social justice and public health action; and to introduce them to conceptual tools that can inform advocacy and policy formation and evaluation. Class participation, a book review, an OpEd, and a final paper required.

Ali Miller

Th

9:25-11:15am

Online

GLBL 244

PLSC 445

The Politics of Fascism

Study of the rise of fascism in Europe in the 1930s and its deployment during the Second World War as a road map to understanding the resurgence of nationalism and populism in today’s political landscape, both in Europe and the United States.

Lauren Young

T

1:30-3:20pm

Online

ANTH 244

Social Change in Contemporary Southeast Asia

This course examines a number of significant forms of social change occurring in Southeast Asia in recent years. Fueled by new digital technologies; environmental change; globalized economies, politics, human rights, and religion—Southeast Asia is experiencing a rapid transformation. Some of these changes are visible such as the ubiquitous use of mobile phones, transformed city skylines, rampant deforestation, and changing infrastructure. However, some are less visible such as the forced evacuations of the poor from urban centers, increasing state surveillance, and new forms of relationships between people and places enabled through digital communications. Topics include migration, politics and political activism, urban development, environmentalism, labor, violence, religion, popular culture, gender, and relationships. Principle readings include key works from a range of disciplines and represent a number of Southeast Asian nations. The course includes a visual component through a number of in class film screenings.

Erik Harms

TTh

9:00-10:15am

Online

Spring 2020

COURSE NUMBER

TITLE

DESCRIPTION

NAME OF FACULTY

TIME AND DAYS

AFST 369 

MMES 369 

FREN 369

Deserts, Oceans, Islands: Literature of Migration and Refugee

A critical study of literature and film that charts different spaces shaped by intersecting—or colliding—routes of colonization and forced migration: deserts (Sahara, Sonoran), oceans (Indian, Atlantic, Mediterranean), and islands (Haiti, Martinique, Zanzibar, Mauritius, Sri Lanka). Students contribute to the Desert Futures interdisciplinary symposium to be held at Yale in spring 2020. Seminar is conducted in English. Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of French required (FREN 160 or above; contact instructor with questions about language preparation).

Jill Jarvis

M 1:30-3:20pm

AMST 206

ER&M 221

WGSS 222

Introduction to Critical Refugee Studies

Reconfiguring refugees as fluid subjects and sites of social, political, and cultural critiques. Departing from dominant understandings of refugees as victims, consideration instead of refugees as complex historical actors, made visible through processes of colonization, imperialism, war, displacement, state violence, and globalization, as well as ethical, social, legal, and political transformations. Focus on second-half of the twentieth century.

Q. Tran

W 9:25-11:15am

AMST 452

AMST 628

ER&M 452

Movement, Memory, and US Settler Colonialism

This research seminar examines and theorizes the significance of movement and mobility in the production and contestation of settler colonial nation-states. To do so, it brings together the fields of settler colonial studies, critical indigenous studies, ethnic studies, public history, and mobility studies. After acquainting ourselves with the foundations and some of the key debates within each of these fields, we examine four case studies: The Freedom Trail and the Black Heritage Trail in Boston; the Lewis and Clark expedition and its recuperation as a site of healing and education for tribal nations in the Upper Midwest and Northwest; the Trail of Tears and the contest over southern memory; and the relationships between settlement, labor migration, and regional racial formation in California. Students then conduct their own research projects that integrate primary source research on a particular organized movement (of people, non-human animals, ideas, practices) with two or more expressions of memory about that movement (in the form of public history installations, popular culture, literature, music, digital memes, etc.). 

This course is best suited to students who have initial ideas about a potential research topic and are exploring related ideas for their senior essay.

Laura Barraclough

T 9:25-11:15am

AMST 625 

ENGL 885

The Transpacific Mid-Century

This course explores Asian American and American Orientalist cultural production during the Cold War through four kinds of middleness: we study a mid-level war waged at mid-century through middlebrow culture both by and about “middleman” minorities. Despite the specificity of this description, we find “the middle” to be baggy, mundane, overwhelming, and often inexorable, as both an object and a method of analysis. Our mid-century historical period has loose and tapering beginnings and ends. Our middlebrow archive consists of non-monumental materials, including out-of-print memoirs, pulp fiction, tourist guidebooks, and advertisements. The mid-level war that we are periodizing often blurs the distinction between wartime and peacetime. The subject produced by Cold War middlebrow culture (the Oriental) seems peripheral to the period’s more iconic figures (the Communist, the Negro, and the Homosexual). In reflecting on the course’s archive, period, and subject of investigation, we have occasion to contemplate our own research methodologies alongside thinkers such as Rey Chow, Saidiya Hartman, Diana Taylor, and Michel Foucault. Our readings also cover topics such as tourism, refugee migration, Chinatown, and the “model minority.” In addition to cultural ephemera, we engage more recognizable Cold War personalities, including Jade Snow Wong, James Michener, William Holden, Epeli Hau‘ofa, and Suzie Wong. The course concludes with the publication of Maxine Hong Kingston’s The Woman Warrior in 1976.

Sunny Xiang

T 9:25-11:15am

ANTH 339

ANTH 539

Urban Ethnography of Asia

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Asian cities. Focus on new ethnographies about cities in East, Southeast, and South Asia. Topics include rural-urban migration, redevelopment, evictions, social movements, land grabbing, master-planned developments, heritage preservation, utopian aspirations, social housing, slums and precariousness, and spatial cleansing.

Erik Harms

M 9:25-11:15am

ECON 449

EP&E 244

PLSC 374

The Economic Analysis of Conflict

Introduction to the microeconomic analysis of internal conflict. In particular, how conflict imposes economic costs on the population and how people react to conflict. Topics include the correlates of war; the economic legacies of conflict on human capital, local institutions, households’ income, and firm’s performance; and the causes and impacts of forced displacement. 

Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomics and econometrics.

Gerard Padro

T-Th 9-10:15am

ECON 465

EP&E 224

GLBL 330

Debating Globalization

Facets of contemporary economic globalization, including trade, investment, and migration. Challenges and threats of globalization: inclusion and inequality, emerging global players, global governance, climate change, and nuclear weapons proliferation. 

Prerequisite: background in international economics and data analysis. Preference to seniors majoring in Economics or EP&E.

Ernesto Zedillo

M 9:25-11:15am

GLBL 341
 

PLSC 450

The Geopolitics of Democracy

The threats to liberal democracy are being widely debated, from the US and Europe to developing nations. In order for democracy to continue to thrive as the cornerstone of Western governance, it must adapt and be relevant to citizens of the 21st century. This course examines our appreciation of what constitutes democracy today and how to apply those understandings to the challenges of the 21st century. Our discussions look at the characteristics of democratic leaders and debate whether America, the bulwark of liberal democracy in the 20th century, is still an exporter of democracy and how that matters in today’s world. We then look at how to protect and adapt democratic institutions such as free elections, civil society, dissent, and the free press in the face of a rising wave of populism and nationalism. The course examines how refugee crises from conflict regions and immigration impact democracies and debate the accelerating paradigm shifts of income inequality and technology on democratic institutions. We conclude the course with a discussion of the forms of democratic governance that are meaningful in the 21st century and the practicalities of designing or reforming democratic institutions to confront current challenges.

Lauren Young

T 1:30-3:20pm

GLBL 620

Global Crisis Response

With a special emphasis on the United States, this course explores how the international community responds to humanitarian crises and military interventions. We examine the roles and responsibilities of members of the diplomatic corps, senior military officials, nongovernmental organizations, and international financial organizations in order to understand the skill sets required for these organizations to be effective. Through readings, discussions, role-play, writing exercises, and other tools, we learn how organizations succeed and sometimes fail in assisting individuals and nations in peril. We examine emerging regional hot spots, with an emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. We explore the challenges facing the governments, civil society organizations, and businesses in the aftermath of crises and the impact on citizens. We review the effectiveness of regional organizations like the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), and the African Union (AU) in assisting governments rebuild and stabilize their societies. We have several role-playing simulations during which students play the role of an individual or organization responsible for briefing counterparts on key events.

Harry Thomas

Th 1:30-2:30pm

GLBL 685

Arab Spring, Arab Winter, and U.S. Policy in the Middle East and North Africa

This seminar first studies the increased repression in states destabilized during the Arab Spring and looks at pervasive roles of the security services and corruption. After a detailed look at the coup d’état in Egypt, contrasted with more hopeful developments in Tunisia, we consider the outlook for mainstream Islamists as well as Salafis and jihadis. The seminar spends a session examining the U.S. counterterrorism 

campaigns. It then studies the conflicts in Syria and Iraq and the impact of refugee flows in the region. Finally, the seminar examines the particular economic and climate challenges that confront the regional states. Throughout, we look at American policy responses and choices, but the greatest focus is on the agency that these countries themselves have. Students leave the course with an understanding of the major internal political pressures operating on Arab states since independence, the pressures that also are exerted on them from regional and international actors, and the difficulties American policy makers have addressing these pressures. The seminar should also give students a strong grasp of the policy-making process in the modern American foreign policy establishment. Also LAW 21104.

Robert Ford

T 3:30-5:30pm

GLBL 604

Four Conflicts: Iraq, Syria, Yemen, and Afghanistan

This course focuses on four recent conflicts—Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen—using human rights as a sustaining theme. The instructor uses her on-the-ground knowledge to dig deep into the roots of the conflicts; the specific battles; turning points; the case studies of human rights abuse; and finally, possible political solutions and post-conflict resolution. We use a mix of video footage from reputable journalists as well as testimonies, texts, and articles from the time. An important dimension is lessons learned from previous wars, and the diplomatic and international response. There will be two or three guest speakers who were directly involved in the individual conflicts. Students have assigned readings and three blogs to write, as well as a final presentation, which can take the form of a long essay, an academic paper, or an audiovisual presentation, with approval from the instructor. Class participation constitutes a large portion of the grade; students must be willing to engage and debate throughout.

Janine di Giovanni

M 9:25-11:15am

HIST 149J

A History of the Border Wall: From the Frontier to the Border Wall in US History

Ever since the US’s founding, the idea of an open and ever-expanding frontier has been central to United States identity. Symbolizing a future of endless promise, the frontier made possible the United States’ belief in itself as an exceptional nation—democratic, individualistic, forward-looking. Today, the country has a new symbol: the border wall. This course focuses on both the current crisis at the U.S.-Mexican border, which has consumed the country’s attention and challenged its public morality and national identity, and the long history that has led to the crisis. After an introductory period focused mostly on the history of the U.S. border (with indigenous peoples, Spain, and Mexico), we alternate between issues pertaining to the current moment and the larger historical context. We read about and discuss events of the moment, related to the immediate causes of migration, the rise of nativism in the U.S., along with calls for building a border wall, family separation and child detention policies, and the activity of the Border Patrol and the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency, as we continue to set the current crisis in historical context.

Greg Grandin

T 9:25-11:15am

HLTH 485

Global Health Justice: Advocacy, Power, and Change

This class provides Yale College seniors (with priority given to Global Health Studies Scholars) the opportunity to comprehensively interrogate critical topics at the intersection of global health, policy, and justice with a focus on advocacy as a tool, and health equity as a goal. Through a weekly seminar (with 

readings, case studies, guest lectures, and seminar-style discussion), students develop the knowledge and tools to engage critically and constructively with the ideas and practices constituting advocacy, movement-building, and policy-making in global health, and work to develop a capstone project in which they explore and/or present various forms of policy development, strategic advocacy, and/or claims-making in global health. Course readings and approaches draw from human rights, public health, historical, anthropological, and other critical frames in order to introduce students to the multiple lenses through which questions of global health justice can be addressed. This course is designed to encompass diverse disciplinary perspectives and approaches: final products can be theoretically focused or analytic papers, strategic development/arguments for policy development and/or assessment of historical or archival research. This course is a requirement for all Global Health Studies Scholars who are graduating seniors and who did not complete HLTH 490 in Fall 2018. Yale College seniors who are not Global Health Studies Scholars but who have significant interest and prior coursework in global health, as well as ideas for a final project, can write to the instructors sharing their relevant background and requesting permission to enroll. Cap of 15 students.

A. Miller

Th 9:25-11:15am

AFST 135 

PLSC 135

Media and Conflict

The theory and practice of reporting on international conflict and war, and its relation to political discourse in the United States and abroad. Materials include case studies of media coverage of war in Europe, Africa, and the Middle East.

Graeme Wood

M 9:25-11:15am

ENGL 240 

GLBL 349

Reporting and Writing on War

This course examines how to identify, interview, and document human rights violations in the field while reporting on war. It is aimed at students who want to work as journalists, advocates or policy makers, or anyone who wants to work as a practitioner during a conflict or humanitarian crisis. The instructor brings her twenty-five years as a field reporter in war zones into the classroom: the goal is to make the learning functional. The course teaches students how to compile their findings in the form of reports and articles for newspapers, magazines as well as advocacy letters, op-eds, and Blogs. We develop skills for “crunching” talking points for presentations and briefing papers. Each week focuses on a theme and links it to a geographical conflict. Students emerge with practical research, writing, and presentation skills when dealing with sensitive human rights material–for instance, victims’ evidence. 

Course open only to juniors and seniors

Janine di Giovanni

M 3:30-5:20pm

LAW 30170  International Refugee Assistance Project 

This course will introduce students to international refugee law through practice and theory. Students work in pairs under the supervision of private attorneys to represent refugees or visa applicants abroad who are seeking safe legal passage to the United States or another third country. To gain an understanding of refugee law, students will read about and discuss the history of international refugee protection and resettlement regimes, U.S. statutes and case law governing refugees, United Nations mandates and procedures, and the interplay between international relations, foreign policy and humanitarian aid. To develop practical skills, students will reflect on their casework through class sessions on intercultural lawyering, working with interpreters, and legal ethics. Guest lecturers will include practitioners and scholars in the field of refugee law. Permission of the instructors required. S.T. Poellot and J.M. Kornfeld.

Stephen T. Poellot & Julie M. Kornfeld  T 4:10-6:00 pm