Courses

Fall 2020 | Spring 2021

Spring 2021

COURSE NUMBER

TITLE

DESCRIPTION

NAME OF FACULTY

TIME AND DAYS

AFAM 459

ER&M 402

AMST 479

The Displaced: Migrant and Refugee Narratives of the 20th and 21st Centuries

This course examines a series of transnational literary texts and films that illuminate how the displaced—migrants, exiles, and refugees— remake home away from their native countries. The twentieth and twenty-first centuries have produced massive displacements due to wars, genocides, racial, ethnic and religious conflicts, economic and climate change, among other factors. Our course focuses on several texts that explore questions of home, nation, and self in the context of specific historical events such as the Holocaust, civil rights movements in the U.S., internment, the Indian partition, African decolonization, and Middle Eastern/Arab ethno-religious conflicts and wars. We examine these events alongside the shifting legal and political policies and categories related to asylum, humanitarian parole, refugee, and illegal alien status. Exploring themes such as nostalgia, longing, trauma, and memory, we look at the possibilities and limitations of creating, contesting, and imagining home in the diaspora. Our objective is to debate and develop the ethical, political, geographic, and imaginative articulations of home in an era of mass displacements and geo-political crises. We examine how notions of home are imagined alongside and against categories of race, gender, and sexuality.

Leah Mirakhor

T

1:30pm-3:20pm

Online

AFST 378

EVST 378

S&DS 138

AFST 570

Foreign Assistance to Sub-Saharan Africa: Archival Data Analysis

This course reviews the many years of U.S. development assistance to Africa using archival data from the Agency for International Development (USAID), nonprofit organizations, and specialized agencies such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture and nineteen U.S. government agencies involved in development assistance to Africa. Students analyze the effectiveness, perception, and shifting development paradigms of such assistance, looking at four specific areas: agriculture, water and sanitation, child survival, and refugee relief. Advanced text-mining analysis in the R package tm and web-scraping algorithms in Python are applied to both archival and current data to enhance analysis.

Russell Barbour

TTh

2:30pm-3:45pm

Online

GLBL 341

PLSC 450

The Geopolitics of Democracy

The threats to liberal democracy are being widely debated, from the US and Europe to developing nations.   In order for democracy to continue to thrive as the cornerstone of Western governance, it must adapt and be relevant to citizens of the 21st century. This course examines our appreciation of what constitutes democracy today and how to apply those understandings to the challenges of the 21st century. Our discussions look at the characteristics of democratic leaders and debate whether America, the bulwark of liberal democracy in the 20th century, is still an exporter of democracy and how that matters in today’s world. We then look at how to protect and adapt democratic institutions such as free elections, civil society, dissent, and the free press in the face of a rising wave of populism and nationalism. The course examines how refugee crises from conflict regions and immigration impact democracies and debate the accelerating paradigm shifts of income inequality and technology on democratic institutions.  We conclude the course with a discussion of the forms of democratic governance that are meaningful in the 21st century and the practicalities of designing or reforming democratic institutions to confront current challenges.

Lauren Young

T

1:30pm-3:20pm

Online

GLBL 613

How to Analyze, Design, and Fund a Project: A Case Study of Regeneration of Umm Qais in Jordan

This course gives students a chance to explore and practice three important components of running development projects: practical action, designing the project (the detail, not the theory), and presenting and fundraising for it. This is done through a case study of Turquoise Mountain’s project in Jordan to regenerate the historic area of Umm Qais, on the very northern tip of Jordan, overlooking the Golan Heights, the Sea of Galilee, and Syria. This area includes the ancient city of Gadara, which is now a huge archaeological site; the historic and ruined Ottoman village of Umm Qais; and the new town of Umm Qais, which is home to Jordanians and Syrians. We explore the complexities of working with refugees in host countries, working with the government, getting buy-in from the community. And we practice presenting the project to different audiences, which is a critical skill for anyone working in development. Students also, in small groups, research and present the key dimensions of the project, including preservation of cultural heritage; revenue generation at historic sites; tourism—the visitor experience; and sustainability, infrastructure, and the financial model. Each group focuses on comparable models/success stories, pitfalls/traps, and suggestions.

Shoshana Stewart

Th

9:25am-11:15am

HLH55 HORCHOW - HLH55 HORCHOW

GLBL 685

Arab Spring, Arab Winter, and U.S. Policy in the Middle East and North Africa

This seminar reviews how the United States has responded to weakening states and unrest in the MENA region. Each session examines a particular policy challenge, examining dynamics on the ground, what Washington understood to be its national security interest, and how it developed its policies in terms of strategies and tactics to achieve the perceived national interest. The seminar ranges from the 2013 coup d’état in Egypt to American approaches to political Islam to wars in Yemen, Libya, and Syria. One session examines the American drive to promote federalism in Iraq and the outcomes there, and another assesses the American counterterrorism campaign in the region since 2011. We also examine the challenge of increased refugee flows and the increasing problems connected to climate change, particularly water. Students should leave the course with an understanding of the pressures operating on Arab states and the difficulties American policy makers have addressing these pressures. The seminar should also give students a strong grasp of the policy-making process in the American foreign policy establishment. For those students interested, there are exercises in short-memo writing applicable to the government sector. Also LAW 21104.

Robert Ford

M

3:30pm-5:20pm

Online

GLBL 719

Turning Points in Peace-Building

This course examines the myriad challenges that must be addressed when the fighting has stopped. Once a peace agreement is signed, the real deal-making begins. Former rebels negotiate with their military commanders about relinquishing arms and working for a living; communities look for “peace dividends”; refugees weigh options to return home; governments try to assert authority despite their new role or how weakened they have become; and compatriots who opposed the peace settlement relentlessly try to undermine it. The international community, which often leads the warring parties to the table, takes on a new role as well, informing and sometimes deforming outcomes. Led by a veteran U.S. diplomat, this course considers peace-building processes from the perspectives of formerly warring parties, diplomats, NGOs, civil society, and the media, providing students an opportunity to develop strategies for building durable peace following conflict.

Bisa Williams

T

9:25am-11:15am 

HLH55 HORCHOW - HLH55 HORCHOW

GLBL 304

Four Conflicts: Iraq, Syria, Yemen, and Afghanistan

This course focuses on four recent conflicts—Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, and Yemen—using human rights as a sustaining theme. The instructor uses her on-the-ground knowledge to delve into the roots of the conflicts; the specific battles; turning points; the case studies of human rights abuse; and finally, possible political solutions and post-conflict resolution. We use a mix of video footage from reputable journalists as well as testimonies, texts, and articles from the time. An important dimension is lessons learned from previous wars, and the diplomatic and international response. There will be guest speakers who were directly involved in the individual conflicts.

Janine di Giovanni

T

1:30pm-3:20pm

Online

HIST 365J

MMES 366

Frontiers and Borderlands in the Modern Middle East

This course examines various types of frontiers and borderlands in the early modern and modern Middle East. Beginning with an examination of imperial competition and national identity in borderland contexts, it then addresses boundaries of religious and settled and nomadic populations, before concluding with a case study on the Iran-Iraq border dispute and war in the 1980s.

Sophomore Seminar: Registration preference given to sophomores. Not normally open to first-year students.

Kevin Gledhill

TTh

2:30pm-3:45pm

Online

AMST 623

CPLT 822

Working Group on Globalization and Culture

A continuing yearlong collective research project, a cultural studies “laboratory.” The group, drawing on several disciplines, meets regularly to discuss common readings, develop collective and individual research projects, and present that research publicly. The general theme for the working group is globalization and culture, with three principal aspects: (1) the globalization of cultural industries and goods, and its consequences for patterns of everyday life as well as for forms of fiction, film, broadcasting, and music; (2) the trajectories of social movements and their relation to patterns of migration, the rise of global cities, the transformation of labor processes, and forms of ethnic, class, and gender conflict; (3) the emergence of and debates within transnational social and cultural theory. The specific focus, projects, and directions of the working group are determined by the interests, expertise, and ambitions of the members of the group, and change as its members change.

There are a small number of openings for second-year graduate students. Students interested in participating should contact michael.denning@yale.edu.

Michael Denning

M

1:30pm-3:20pm

Online

ANTH 453

HLTH 425

GLBL 553

Global Health: Equity and Policy

Current debates in global health have focused specifically on health disparities, equity, and policy. This advanced undergraduate seminar class is designed for students seeking to develop an interdisciplinary understanding of health research, practice, and policy.  Each week, we address issues of importance for research and policy, and apply theory, ethics, and practice to global health debates and case studies. The class encourages critical thinking regarding the promotion of health equity. 

Catherine Panter-Brick

W

1:30pm-3:20pm

Online

HIST 277J

Memory and History in Modern Europe

An interdisciplinary study of memory as both a tool in and an agent of modern European history. Collective memory; the media of memory; the organization and punctuation of time through commemorative practices. Specific themes vary but may include memory of the French Revolution, the rise of nationalism, World Wars I and II, the Holocaust, decolonization, the revolution of 1968, the fall of the Berlin Wall, and the end of the Cold War.

Jennifer Allen

T

9:25am-11:15am

Online

PLSC 118

The Moral Foundations of Politics

An introduction to contemporary discussions about the foundations of political argument. Emphasis on the relations between political theory and policy debate (e.g., social welfare provision and affirmative action). Readings from Bentham, Mill, Marx, Burke, Rawls, Nozick, and others.

Ian Shapiro

TTh

11:35am-12:50pm

Online

PLSC 377

SAST 344

WGSS 397

PLSC 772

Political Economy of Gender in South Asia

This course focuses on the political and economic underpinnings and implications of gender inequality in South Asia. We draw on evidence from Bangladesh, Pakistan, and India to guide our theoretical and empirical inquiry into the following broad questions: What is gender, and what approaches do social scientists use to study gender inequality? How does gender inequality manifest in different social, economic, and political spheres e.g. the household, the labor market, the electorate, the government? What are the cultural and structural drivers of gender inequality? How effective are different approaches to tackling gender inequality in South Asia?

Sarah Khan

T

3:30pm-5:20pm

Online

ECON 449

EP&E 244

PLSC 374

The Economic Analysis of Conflict

Since the end of WWII the overwhelming majority of war casualties have been the result of internal conflict. This includes insurgency situations in which foreign powers prop up a weak internal government. In this course we apply microeconomic techniques, theoretical and empirical, to the analysis of internal conflict, its causes and consequences. Topics include forced migration, ethnic conflict, long-term consequences of war and individual choices to participate in violence. Readings comprise frontier research papers and students will learn to critically engage with cutting-edge research designs.

Gerard Padro

Th

9:25am-11:15am

Online

AFAM 305

ENGL 258

African American Autobiography

Examination of African American autobiography, from slave narratives to contemporary memoirs, and how the genre approaches the project (and problem) of knowing, through reading, the relationships of fellow humans. Chronological consideration of a range of narratives and their representations of race, of space, of migration, of violence, of self, and of other, as well as the historical circumstances that inform these representations.

Sarah Mahurin

MW

11:35am-12:50pm

Online

ANTH 388

ANTH 588

Politics of Culture in Southeast Asia

The promotion of national culture as part of political and economic agendas in Southeast Asia. Cultural and political diversity as a method for maintaining a country’s cultural difference in a global world.

Erik Harms

T

9:25am-11:15am

Online

AMST 452

ER&M 452

Movement, Memory, and U.S. Settler Colonialism

This research seminar examines and theorizes the significance of movement and mobility in the production and contestation of settler colonial nation-states. To do so, it brings together the fields of settler colonial studies, critical indigenous studies, ethnic studies, public history, and mobility studies. After acquainting ourselves with the foundations and some of the key debates within each of these fields, we examine four case studies: The Freedom Trail and the Black Heritage Trail in Boston; the Lewis and Clark expedition and its recuperation as a site of healing and education for tribal nations in the Upper Midwest and Northwest; the Trail of Tears and the contest over southern memory; and the relationships between settlement, labor migration, and regional racial formation in California. Students then conduct their own research projects that integrate primary source research on a particular organized movement (of people, non-human animals, ideas, practices) with two or more expressions of memory about that movement (in the form of public history installations, popular culture, literature, music, digital memes, etc.).

Laura Barraclough

Th

3:30pm-5:20pm

Online

AMST 348

ER&M 381

EVST 304

Space, Place, and Landscape

Survey of core concepts in cultural geography and spatial theory. Ways in which the organization, use, and representation of physical spaces produce power dynamics related to colonialism, race, gender, class, and migrant status. Multiple meanings of home; the politics of place names; effects of tourism; the aesthetics and politics of map making; spatial strategies of conquest. Includes field projects in New Haven.

Laura Barraclough

W

3:30pm-5:20pm

Online

ECON 483

PLSC 159

SAST 483

The Political Economy of Migration

Immigration flows are a defining political concern throughout the world, and internal migration is reshaping the political and economic landscape of the developing world. This class aims to bring students to the forefront of political and economic research on migration, with a specific focus on the region of South Asia. Studying the political aspects of migration involves engaging with formal models on the incentives of governments to facilitate or stymie internal and international movement. Studying the economic aspects of migration requires learning about the economic theories underlying location choice. Students continue with the studying of the role that infrastructure plays in regulating movement.

Zack Barnett-Howell

M

9:25am-11:15am

Online

ANTH 216

Migration & Development: Critical Perspectives

Whether international migration, through the remittances of migrant workers, can result in development or in fact obstructs it has been subject to intensive debate in development policy. This course steps outside the policy paradigm, to critique its assumptions, to ask whose welfare is to be served, and to examine migration and development in the context of broader notions of modernity, globalization and neoliberalism. Centered on anthropological scholarship, we consider the making and implementation of migration and development as an international policy field, and the processes through which sending states attempt to shape and regulate out-migration for development. We connect this with readings on the experiences and aspirations of male and female migrants, the situations out of which they migrate, and the ways in which their journeys, labor and remittances shape economic and social change in their home communities. Through these engagements we situate perspectives on and experiences of migration and development in changing historical contexts of global capitalism, inequality, and post-colonial hierarchies.

Jacob Rinck

W

9:25am-11:15am

Online

ER&M 200

Introduction to Ethnicity, Race, and Migration

Historical roots of contemporary ethnic and racial formations and competing theories of ethnicity, race, and migration. Cultural constructions and social practices of race, ethnicity, and migration in the United States and around the world.

Alicia Schmidt Camacho

TTh

11:35am-12:50pm

Online

ECON 465

EP&E 224

GLBL 330

Debating Globalization

Facets of contemporary economic globalization, including trade, investment, and migration. Challenges and threats of globalization: inclusion and inequality, emerging global players, global governance, climate change, and nuclear weapons proliferation.

Ernesto Zedillo

M

9:25am-11:15am

Online

HIST 337

SAST 330

The Indian Ocean World

This lecture course provides a survey of the Indian Ocean’s history, from medieval to contemporary times. By foregrounding oceanic connections, the class links the histories of South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and East Africa. Long before the Atlantic, the Indian Ocean was “global”—it was a crossroads of trade and commerce, following the monsoon winds. We study the centuries-long movement of material culture, of cultural and religious ideas across the ocean’s arc of port cities. We examine how the Indian Ocean became a crucible of competition between empires, as Europeans hungered for its spices and fabled riches, and eventually established dominion. We examine the vast migration of people across the Indian Ocean that followed—indentured, indebted, and free migrants whose labor shaped the modern world. The legacies of that movement that can be seen to this day, in the multicultural but divided societies around the ocean’s rim. In the first half of the twentieth century, the Indian Ocean became a hotbed of political activism; anticolonial movements learned from each other and diasporas became a conduit for new political ideas about nation, race, and equality. Today the Indian Ocean is at the forefront of strategic competition between India and China; perhaps even more significantly, it stands at the front line of climate change and its growing impact. In the last part of the course, we seek to understand how both of these features of the contemporary Indian Ocean world are shaped by a deeper history. Throughout the course, we emphasize how the Indian Ocean world provides a distinctive vantage point from which to understand key processes in global history—slavery and unfree labor, the rise and fall of empires, the formation of diasporas, and massive environmental transformation.

Sunil Amrith

MW

10:30am-11:20am

Online

GLBL 376

GLBL 552

Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia (east, southeast, northeast, south), in a historical and interdisciplinary context, that include international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare. Course is co-taught with a guest professor.

Jing Tsu

T

3:30pm-5:20pm

Online

HMRT 100

PLSC 148

Theories, Practices, and Politics of Human Rights

Introduction to core human-rights issues, ideas, practices, and controversies. The concept of human rights as a philosophical construct, a legal instrument, a political tool, an approach to economic and equity issues, a social agenda, and an international locus of contestation and legitimation. Required for students in the Multidisciplinary Academic Program in Human Rights.

Ryan Thoreson

MW

1:30pm-2:20pm

Online

AFST 316

MMES 316

GLBL 416

PLSC 436

Public Opinion and Political Behavior in the Middle East

This course introduces students to the empirical study of Middle East and North African politics and society. Increasingly, policymakers, journalists, and experts are using new sources of data to analyze regional politics. The sources of protest and revolution, the determinants of electoral behavior, the appeal of political Islam, and the salience of identity are all questions that are amenable to data-driven analysis. In recent years, the amount of available data and the rise of publicly-available tools for collecting, analyzing, and visualizing these data have increased significantly. With a few clicks, students can now analyze the nature of support for Islamist parties across and within countries, explore the use of social media in mobilizing citizens for protest, and investigate the relationship between ethnic and communal identity and patterns of distributive politics. This course introduces students to these tools and the principles behind their use in the context of the contemporary Middle East and North Africa. It encourages students to combine insights from social and political theory with the methodologies of quantitative social science to probe some of the biggest questions animating the contemporary politics of the region. The course assumes some prior knowledge of and training in technical aspects of quantitative research methods.

Daniel Tavana

MW

1pm-2:15pm

Online

MMES 364

PLSC 396

Politics of the Contemporary Middle East

This course is an overview of contemporary politics of the Middle East, and is organized thematically and (more or less) chronologically. We examine prominent explanations for the democratic deficit in the Middle East, and challenge the notion that the region is completely devoid of competitive and meaningful politics. We also explore the ways in which a variety of factors—including foreign intervention, persistent authoritarianism, oil, and Islam, among others—has affected domestic politics. We consider different aspects of domestic politics, including redistribution, gender politics, and public opinion. We end the course by building on what we learned to make sense of the 2010-2011 ‘Arab Spring’ uprisings, in an effort to understand whether these developments mark change or continuity.

Elizabeth Nugent

TTh

10:30am-11:20am

Online

ANTH 361

MMES 315

NELC 318

Decolonizing Kurdistan: People, History and Politics

This seminar explores key themes around decolonization literature and focuses on socio-political and historical developments, discussions, and current situations of the Kurds, an indigenous people of the Middle East living within the nation-state borders of Turkey, Iran, Iraq, and Syria. Their historical homeland, called Kurdistan, has been a battleground between two competing empires, the Ottomans and the Safavids, from the 16th century onwards and paved the way to the current volatile situations following the fall of these empires, the rise of nation-states, and the subsequent British and French colonization of today’s Iraq and Syria in the 19th and early 20th century. The Kurdish population is estimated around 40 to 45 million people, consisting 15 to 20 per cent of overall populations of the nation-states they live in. They are often dubbed as the biggest stateless people in the world, but overlooked and understudied by the scholars of Turkish, Iranian, and Arab Studies, despite the fact that they pose many challenges to the existing scholarship and overall nation-state and nation-building narratives surrounding them. The seminar leads to understanding of the complexities of this understudied area, at a time when the Kurds have been at the center of public and political debate in the Middle East, Europe, the USA, and beyond. It also contributes to the growing literature that looks at decolonization processes and epistemologies as well as the de-exceptionalization of the Middle East, and the Kurds, from these discussions.

Mehmet Kurt

W

1:30pm-3:20pm

Online

GLBL 620

Global Crises Response

With a special emphasis on the United States, this course explores how the international community responds to humanitarian crises and military interventions. We examine the roles and responsibilities of members of the diplomatic corps, senior military officials, nongovernmental organizations, and international financial organizations in order to understand the skill sets required for these organizations to be effective. Through readings, discussions, role-play, writing exercises, and other tools, we learn how organizations succeed and sometimes fail in assisting individuals and nations in peril. We examine emerging regional hot spots, with an emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. We explore the challenges facing the governments, civil society organizations, and businesses in the aftermath of crises and the impact on citizens. We review the effectiveness of regional organizations like the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), and the African Union (AU) in assisting governments rebuild and stabilize their societies. We have several role-playing simulations during which students play the role of an individual or organization responsible for briefing counterparts on key events.

Harry Thomas

Th

1:30pm-3:20pm

Online

PLSC 221

American Extremism in Comparative Perspective

This course interrogates the rise of violent extremism in the United States from a political science perspective. The course draws from research on terrorism and political violence to explain current trends in extremism. We compare made-in-America ideologies like white nationalism and the “alt-right” to extremist movements abroad, from the Red Army Faction to the Islamic State.

Nicholas Lotito

M

9:25am-11:15am

Online

GLBL 288

PLSC 465

Civil-Military Relations and Democratization

This course explores the role of the military in politics, with a focus on processes of democratization. It introduces students to concepts of civilian control, professionalization, and military intervention. The course introduces significant cases from twentieth-century history and surveys contemporary military politics. Topics include coups d’etat, responses to revolution, and democratic transition.

Nicholas Lotito

W

9:25am-11:15am

Online

LAW 30170 International Refugee Assistance Project This course is designed to give students an opportunity to learn about international refugee law in theory and in practice. Students enrolled in the seminar will work under the supervision of attorneys to assist persecuted individuals abroad seeking safe legal passage to the United States or another third country through client assistance, research, or advocacy projects. The course will provide the students with the practical and theoretical knowledge necessary to be effective practitioners of international refugee law. Students will learn the history and context of international refugee protection and resettlement regimes, U.S. statutory and case law surrounding refugee proceedings, United Nations mandates and procedures, and the interplay between international relations, foreign policy and humanitarian aid. The course will also teach necessary practical skills, including intercultural lawyering, working with interpreters, and legal ethics. All students’ work will further the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP)’s mission; IRAP is an organization founded by Yale Law students that works with displaced persons to identify and navigate pathways to safety through free direct legal representation, systemic advocacy, and litigation. Guest lecturers will include practitioners and scholars in the field of refugee law. Permission of the instructors required. S.T. Poellot and J.M. Kornfeld.

Stephen Poellot

Julie Kornfeld

T

4:10 PM-6:00 PM

Online

Fall 2020

COURSE NUMBER

TITLE

DESCRIPTION

NAME OF FACULTY

TIME AND DAYS

HIST 363J

SAST 334

ER&M 433

Mobile South Asians and the Global Legal Order

South Asians make up the largest population of overseas migrants in the world, close to 33 million in 2017 and a diaspora that is almost double that number. This course looks at the unprecedented mobility of South Asians from the mid-19th century until now as merchants, indentured labor, students, pilgrims, professionals, domestic workers, political exiles, refugees, and economic migrants, through the lens of state attempts to control movement and individual resistance, subversion, and adaptation to such controls. Focusing on the legal consciousness of South Asian migrants and the emergence of South Asian nations as political players on the global stage, this class traces how South Asian mobility led to the forging of a new global order, over migration, multiculturalism, Islamic law, civil liberties, labor law, and international law.

Rohit De

T

9:25-11:15am

Online

CLSS 856

HIST 506

MDVL 506

Human Migration in Antiquity

This course examines the processes of human migration in premodern societies with an emphasis on ancient Rome. It explores voluntary and forced migrations, their motivations, processes, and outcomes. Particular attention is paid to sources and problems in the period of late antiquity, when human migration helped drive the collapse of the Roman Empire.

Noel Lenski

M

3:30-6pm

* LC 317

AFAM 011

ENGL 007

Literature of the Black South

This course examines the enduring and often unanticipated connections between African American and Southern literature, and considers the ways in which the American South remains a space that simultaneously represents and repels an African American ethos. Through topics and lenses as varied as the Black church, the Great Migration, the Civil Rights Movement, and the rural/urban divide, we consider the ways in which Black culture and Southern culture continue to intersect and interact—even when the natal (Southern) place has ostensibly been rejected or abandoned.

Sarah Mahurin

MW

11:35-12:50pm

Online

EVST 305

MMES 305

GLBL 301

GLBL 505

Environmental Security in the Middle East

This course overviews how environmental, water, food, energy, and climate change have increasingly become linked to human and national security in the Middle East. It begins by exploring the state of the environment in the region and how the policies of the Middle East governments have lead to serious environmental degradation and subsequent loss of jobs, migration, social tension, violence, and regional conflicts. Drawing on an in-depth analysis of contemporary case/country studies, students learn how these problems can serve as major human and national security threats.

Kaveh Madani

W

1:30-3:20pm

Online

ANTH 244

Social Change in Contemporary Southeast Asia

This course examines a number of significant forms of social change occurring in Southeast Asia in recent years. Fueled by new digital technologies; environmental change; globalized economies, politics, human rights, and religion—Southeast Asia is experiencing a rapid transformation. Some of these changes are visible such as the ubiquitous use of mobile phones, transformed city skylines, rampant deforestation, and changing infrastructure. However, some are less visible such as the forced evacuations of the poor from urban centers, increasing state surveillance, and new forms of relationships between people and places enabled through digital communications. Topics include migration, politics and political activism, urban development, environmentalism, labor, violence, religion, popular culture, gender, and relationships. Principle readings include key works from a range of disciplines and represent a number of Southeast Asian nations. The course includes a visual component through a number of in class film screenings.

Erik Harms

TTh

9-10:15am

Online

WGSS 325

ER&M 324

Asian Diasporas since 1800

Examination of the diverse historical and contemporary experiences of people from East, South, and Southeast Asian ancestry living in the Americas, Australia, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Europe. Organized thematically and comparative in scope, topics include labor migrations, community formations, chain migrations, transnational connections, intergenerational dynamics, interracial and ethnic relations, popular cultures, and return migrations.

Quan Tran

W

1:30-3:20pm

Online

ER&M 381

AMST 348

EVST 304

Space, Place, and Landscape

Survey of core concepts in cultural geography and spatial theory. Ways in which the organization, use, and representation of physical spaces produce power dynamics related to colonialism, race, gender, class, and migrant status. Multiple meanings of home; the politics of place names; effects of tourism; the aesthetics and politics of map making; spatial strategies of conquest. Includes field projects in New Haven.

Laura Barraclough

W

3:30-5:20pm

Online

MMES 271

GLBL 271

GLBL 713

Middle East Politics

Exploration of the international politics of the Middle East through a framework of analysis that is partly historical and partly thematic. How the international system, as well as social structures and political economy, shape state behavior. Consideration of Arab nationalism; Islamism; the impact of oil; Cold War politics; conflicts; liberalization; the Arab-spring, and the rise of the Islamic State.

Emma Sky

T

3:30-5:20pm

Online

GLBL 101

Gateway to Global Affairs

Collaboration between faculty and practitioners to discuss key topics and themes related to diplomacy, development, and defense.

Emma Sky

TTh

1:00-2:15pm

Online

GLBL 646

Four Conflicts through a Human Rights Lens

This course focuses on four conflicts of the 1990s—Bosnia, Sierra Leone, Rwanda, and Kosovo—specifically through the lens of human rights, which are all linked by a common theme: humanitarian intervention. In some cases, it went horribly wrong, Rwanda and Bosnia being prime examples. In other cases—Sierra Leone—the wars were able to end. The 1990s was the era of supposed “humanitarian intervention” and “just” wars, when doctrines such as “The Blair Doctrine” presided and were used to save civilian lives. Can we learn from what happened in that decade given the horror of Syria, Yemen, Afghanistan, and Iraq today? The course uses a mix of video footage from the wars from reputable journalists as well as testimonies, texts, and articles from the time. Students also examine the 1990s conflicts under the Right to Protect doctrine of Kofi Annan and compare how humanitarian intervention was used then—as opposed to now, in the case of the Syrian war. An important dimension of the course is lessons learned. The Blair Doctrine is examined. There are several guest speakers throughout the term who were directly involved in these conflicts.

Janine di Giovanni

F

12:30-2:20pm

*HLH55

MMES 121

PLSC 121

International Relations of the Middle East

This course explores the multiple causes of insecurity in the Middle East and North Africa, a region of paramount geostrategic interest, whose populations have suffered from armed conflicts both within and across national borders. The first half of the course interrogates traditional security concepts like war, terrorism, and revolution, as well as the political, economic, and social contexts which give rise to these phenomena. The course then turns to foreign policy analysis in case studies of the region’s major states. Previous coursework in international relations and/or Middle East politics or history recommended but not required.

Nicholas Lotito

MW

1:30-2:20pm

Online 

HIST 380

MMES 379

The Making of the Modern Middle East, 1800-1980

This course surveys the history of the modern Middle East from the start of the 19th century through the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran. Importantly, the course problematizes the idea of ‘modernity’ in our historical understanding of the region. Using as a general framework the transition from empire to nation-state, it explores several key themes including discourses and practices of colonialism across the region, the creation of ethno-national, sectarian, and religious identities, social and political upheavals wrought by revolts, rebellions, and new state formations, the changing nature of economies and labor, the rise of authoritarian leadership, the ideological spread of Arab socialism, anti-colonialism, pan-Islamism, and other political and social byproducts and consequences of the creation of ‘modern’ states. Each week we cover the ways these themes impacted the wider Middle East and North Africa. The readings and lectures encourage students to critically examine the historical explanations, definitions, and arguments regarding the impact or the non-impact of modernity as the driving force for transformations and stagnations in society, culture, politics, and state-formation across the Middle East and North Africa. Class materials include a range of primary source materials and documents in English and in translation, secondary sources, and podcasts.

Kevin Gledhill

MW

2:30-3:20pm

Online

HIST 980

Genocide in History and Theory

Comparative research and analysis of genocidal occurrences around the world from ancient times to the present; theories and case studies; an interregional, interdisciplinary perspective. Readings and discussion, guest speakers, research paper.

Ben Kiernan

Th

1:30-3:20pm

Online

PLSC 942

Political Violence and Its Legacies Workshop

The MacMillan Political Violence and Its Legacies (PVL) workshop is an interdisciplinary forum for work in progress by Yale faculty and graduate students, as well as scholars from other universities. PVL is designed to foster a wide-ranging conversation at Yale and beyond about political violence and its effects that transcends narrow disciplinary and methodological divisions. The workshop’s interdisciplinary nature attracts faculty and graduate students from Anthropology, African American Studies, American Studies, History, Sociology, and Political Science, among others. There are no formal presentations. Papers are distributed one week prior to the workshop and are read in advance by attendees. A discussant introduces the manuscript and raises questions for the subsequent discussion period. To help facilitate a lively and productive discussion, we ban laptops and cellphones for the workshop’s duration. If you are affiliated with Yale University and would like to join the mailing list, please send an e-mail to julia.bleckner@yale.edu with “PVL Subscribe” in the subject line.

Elisabeth Wood

HTBA

Online

AMST 622

CPLT 622

Working Group on Globalization and Culture

A continuing yearlong collective research project, a cultural studies “laboratory.” The group, drawing on several disciplines, meets regularly to discuss common readings, develop collective and individual research projects, and present that research publicly. The general theme for the working group is globalization and culture, with three principal aspects: (1) the globalization of cultural industries and goods, and its consequences for patterns of everyday life as well as for forms of fiction, film, broadcasting, and music; (2) the trajectories of social movements and their relation to patterns of migration, the rise of global cities, the transformation of labor processes, and forms of ethnic, class, and gender conflict; (3) the emergence of and debates within transnational social and cultural theory. The specific focus, projects, and directions of the working group are determined by the interests, expertise, and ambitions of the members of the group, and change as its members change.

Michael Denning

M

1:30-3:20pm

Online

GLBL 740

The Western Hemisphere: Designing a Transnational Policy Agenda

This course explores four critical public policy issues and societal challenges confronting the Western Hemisphere region: inequality, corruption, migration, and race, gender, and sexuality. Governments must rethink their priorities. Citizens are seeking greater accountability from political leaders. All of these issues transcend national boundaries. What does a proactive transnational policy agenda for the region look like? How can national leaders restore the credibility of democratic governance and create new economic opportunities? What, if any, role could the U.S. government and international institutions play in supporting initiatives in these areas?

Francisco Palmieri

W

7:00-8:50pm

*HLH55

HMRT 400

Advanced Human Rights Colloquium

This course is the culminating seminar for Yale College seniors in the Multidisciplinary Academic Program in Human Rights (Human Rights Scholars). The goal of the colloquium is to help students conceive and produce a meaningful capstone project as a culmination of their work in the program. It is a singular opportunity for students to pursue in-depth research in human rights.

Jim Silk

HTBA

Online

ANTH 386

GLBL 393

Humanitarian Interventions: Ethics, Politics, and Health

Analysis of humanitarian interventions from a variety of social science disciplinary perspectives. Issues related to policy, legal protection, health care, morality, and governance in relation to the moral imperative to save lives in conditions of extreme adversity. Promotion of dialogue between social scientists and humanitarian practitioners.

Catherine Panter-Brick

W

1:30-3:20pm

Online

GLBL 366

Politics of Global Health

Interest in and attention to global health has expanded considerably in recent years. Public and private sector investments in solving global health challenges are increasing. Many of the challenges to solving global health problems though are not only in the resources required to close existing gaps. Politics, policy and power are dominant in the global health sphere. Understanding these dynamics is essential to helping to tackle the world’s greatest global health challenges. This course examines the intricate and diverse politics of global health and how they shape our inclination, ability, and direction of response to global health challenges. We explore the historical and current day power dynamics affecting health burdens, and which actually have effects on the health system’s ability to care for a population. We explore the principle actors in the global health space, and how they are governed. Discussions also consider how health intersects with economics, national security, the law and regulation, climate change and conflict. Finally we explore the power dynamics within “ourselves” and how health is valued on a personal level through examination of specific countries health systems; we explore how countries have embraced health as a right (or not)  and designed their health systems to care for their complete populations (or not).

Vanessa Kerry

T

1:30-3:20pm

Online

GMAN 208

HIST 254

Germany from Unification to Refugee Crisis

The history of Germany from its unification in 1871 through the present. Topics include German nationalism and national unification; the culture and politics of the Weimar Republic; National Socialism and the Holocaust; the division of Germany and the Cold War; the Student Movement and New Social Movements; reunification; and Germany’s place in contemporary Europe.

Jennifer Allen

MW

11:35-12:50pm

Online

LAW 20118

PLSC 300

EP&E 354

PLSC 623

Rethinking the Political Enlightenment

Rethinking the Political Enlightenment: Seminar (20118). 2 units.The calamities wrought by Fascism and Nazism, together with growing disillusionment at the excesses and direction of Soviet communism and then Mao’s China, led many postwar intellectuals to rethink the Enlightenment’s promise. In politics that promise had centered on the creation of durable political institutions based on scientific principles that would foster, expand, and protect human freedom. We will study the ways in which the harsh realities of twentieth century politics led political theorists to modify, recast, and in some cases reject these Enlightenment aspirations, and we will evaluate those responses from the perspective of our contemporary politics. Readings will be drawn from, among others, Jonathan Israel, James Tully, George Orwell, Hannah Arendt, Herbert Marcuse, Nicos Poulantzas, Jürgen Habermas, Leo Strauss, Isaiah Berlin, Michel Foucault, Richard Rorty, Alasdair MacIntyre, Charles Taylor, Anthony Appiah, Nancy Fraser, Carole Pateman, Katherine MacKinnon, Judith Butler, Uday Mehta, Charles Mills, Judith Shklar, Quentin Skinner, J.G.A. Pocock, Michael Walzer, and Iris Marion Young. Among the themes discussed will be the connections between Enlightenment aspirations and the ideas of modernization, progress, and democracy; the advantages and limitations of periodization in the study of political theory; teleological conceptions of history; and the role of truth in political argument.

Ian Shapiro

M

1:30-3:20pm

Online

       

T

4:10 PM-6:00 PM

Online

PLSC 116

Comparative Politics: States, Regimes, and Conflict

Introduction to the study of politics and political life in the world outside the United States. State formation and nationalism, the causes and consequences of democracy, the functioning of authoritarian regimes, social movements and collective action, and violence.

Sarah Khan

TTh

11:35-12:25pm

Online

SBS 585

GLBL 529

WGSS 529

Sexuality, Gender, Health, and Human Rights

This course explores the application of human rights perspectives and practices to issues in regard to sexuality, gender, and health. Through reading, interactive discussion, paper presentation, and occasional outside speakers, students learn the tools and implications of applying rights and law to a range of sexuality and health-related topics. The overall goal is twofold: to engage students in the world of global sexual health and rights policy making as a field of social justice and public health action; and to introduce them to conceptual tools that can inform advocacy and policy formation and evaluation. Class participation, a book review, an OpEd, and a final paper required.

Ali Miller

Th

9:25-11:15am

Online

GLBL 244

PLSC 445

The Politics of Fascism

Study of the rise of fascism in Europe in the 1930s and its deployment during the Second World War as a road map to understanding the resurgence of nationalism and populism in today’s political landscape, both in Europe and the United States.

Lauren Young

T

1:30-3:20pm

Online

ANTH 244

Social Change in Contemporary Southeast Asia

This course examines a number of significant forms of social change occurring in Southeast Asia in recent years. Fueled by new digital technologies; environmental change; globalized economies, politics, human rights, and religion—Southeast Asia is experiencing a rapid transformation. Some of these changes are visible such as the ubiquitous use of mobile phones, transformed city skylines, rampant deforestation, and changing infrastructure. However, some are less visible such as the forced evacuations of the poor from urban centers, increasing state surveillance, and new forms of relationships between people and places enabled through digital communications. Topics include migration, politics and political activism, urban development, environmentalism, labor, violence, religion, popular culture, gender, and relationships. Principle readings include key works from a range of disciplines and represent a number of Southeast Asian nations. The course includes a visual component through a number of in class film screenings.

Erik Harms

TTh

9:00-10:15am

Online