Spouses And Partners

PRFDHR Seminar: The Causes and Consequences of Ethnic Violence in Myanmar, Dr. Paula López Peña

The Rohingya crisis is one of the world’s worst ongoing human-rights atrocities, but its causes are contested and its consequences are poorly understood. Dr. López Peña and her co-authors marshal a variety of existing and original data to shed light on its drivers, characteristics, and human cost. First, in contrast with the government’s preferred narrative, they show that violence against civilians in Myanmar clearly responds to economic motives: it increases during times when international rice prices are high, in places suitable for rice cultivation.

PRFDHR Seminar: Refugee-led Responses to Overlapping Precarity: Views from North Lebanon, Professor Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

Professor Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh traces the different ways that residents of Baddawi refugee camp in North Lebanon have been affected by COVID-19 since March 2020, and how they have been responding to protect themselves and other conflict-affected people in the midst of the pandemic. The latter include processes that resonate with a long history of refugee-led mutual aid initiatives.

PRFDHR Seminar: Prison or Sanctuary? An Evaluation of Camps for Syrian Refugees, Dr. Thomas Ginn

Camps are a controversial strategy to manage an influx of refugees. Host countries want to minimize negative effects on citizens, but relief organizations worry that isolation reduces employment and self-reliance over time. Using a large and representative survey, Dr. Ginn studies Syrians in Jordan and Iraq, comparing camp residents to other refugees who self-settle in the same country. He identifies the effects of camp residence with multiple strategies: controlling for a rich set of observables, and a difference-in-differences with Lebanon where camps were never opened.

PRFDHR Seminar: Impacts of a Refugee Shelter Program: Experimental Evidence from the Syrian Refugee Life Survey, Professor Edward Miguel

With a record number of refugees moving across the globe, there is much debate among policymakers and academics on how best to provide for refugees’ humanitarian needs while also ensuring the stability of host countries’ political and economic institutions and preventing radicalization among affected groups. As a result, many non-profits and intergovernmental organizations have come together to implement programs that support both refugees and host communities.

PRFDHR Seminar: Growing up Under Forced Displacement: Evidence from Bangladesh and Jordan, Professor Sarah Baird and Professor Jennifer Seager

Cumulative trauma due to displacement and exposure to violence can lead to long-run impacts on mental health, with consequences for human capital accumulation. This may be particularly true for adolescents given that this is a time of intensified emotional distress and a critical period for development. Using mixed-methods longitudinal data from the Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE) study on over 6,000 refugee adolescents aged 10-17 and their local peers in Bangladesh and Jordan this research explores the challenges faced by adolescents growing up under forced displacement.

Trust in Translation: The Story behind "Welcome to the New World", Naji Aldabaan, Jake Halpern, Mohammed Kadalah, and Professor Kishwar Rizvi

Based on the New York Times Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic story of a refugee family who fled the civil war in Syria to make a new life in America, this acclaimed novel follows the Aldabaan family as they start a new life in Connecticut. Panelists in this event will examine the role of translation, both linguistic and cultural in the context of refugee resettlement.
Naji Aldabaan | Hall High School
Jake Halpern | New York Times
Mohammed Kadalah | Department of Modern Languages and Literature, Santa Clara University

Webinar: Defying Illegality: Organizing in and around Migrant Detention

Amidst ongoing debates about policing and mass incarceration, migrant detention centers have been focal points for mobilizations against the U.S. carceral regime. Through coordinated protest, testimonial acts, and hunger strikes, incarcerated migrants have drawn attention to systemic abuses in prisons, while defending their rights to belonging, family unification, and transnational mobility. Their actions revealed the ways that ICE used the COVID-19 pandemic to further repress prisoners.

PRFDHR Seminar: Outsourcing Otherness: Race and Belonging in the Morocco-EU Border - Dr. Leslie Gross-Wyrtzen

Studies on European countries “outsourcing” border enforcement and immigration control to neighboring states pose questions about how sovereignty travels beyond nation-state territories; how such transnational regimes are organized in line with market rationalities; and how liberal or humanitarian discourse often reinforces security regimes. Less explored is the relationship between European racial imaginaries, transnational border projects, and shifts in racial-social categories of belonging in neighboring countries.

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