Alumni

PRFDHR Seminar: Rejecting Coethnicity: the Politics of Migrant Exclusion by Minoritized Citizens, Professor Yang-Yang Zhou

Professor Yang-Yang Zhou will be presenting the research of her new book project ‘Rejecting Coethnicity: the Politics of Migrant Exclusion by Minoritized Citizens’. How are migrants received by host countries and communities? A substantial body of scholarship on migrant reception focuses almost exclusively on majority White citizens in the Global North and their (negative) attitudes towards migrants from the Global South.

Laura Briggs- RITM Distinguished Speaker Series

Professor Briggs is an expert on U.S. and international child welfare policy and on transnational and transracial adoption. Briggs’ most recent book, Taking Children: A History of American Terror (University of California Press, 2020), examines the 400-year-old history of the United States’ use of taking children from marginalized communities—from the taking of Black and Native children during America’s founding to the Donald Trump’s policy of family separation for Central American migrants and asylum seekers at the U.S./Mexico border—as a violent tool for political ends.

PRFDHR Seminar: Assessing the Direct and Spillover Effects of Shocks to Refugee Remittances, Professor Sarah Walker

Professor Sarah Walker examines the impact of an exogenous shutdown of remittances to the Kakuma refugee camp in northern Kenya in 2015. She finds that the shutdown did not reduce refugee consumption on average. However, for households that previously received remittances through the networks that were shutdown, consumption decreased, while for those who continued to receive remittances through other mechanisms, consumption increased.

PRFDHR Seminar: Constructing Asylum in a Non-Signatory State: Urban Power and Refugee Resilience in Bangkok, Professor Bhanubhatra "Kaan" Jittiang

The lack of legal status is the primary challenge for more than five thousand refugees and asylum seekers seeking refuge in Bangkok. A refugee is not a legal category under Thai laws as Thailand is a non-signatory state of the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol. Although UNHCR may have screened and granted refugee status, the Thai government has never recognized such legal recognition. Thailand is concerned that giving a refugee status will become a pull factor attracting new waves of the forcibly displaced.

PRFDHR Seminar: Refuge: How the State Shapes Human Potential, Professor Heba Gowayed

Drawing on a global and comparative ethnography, this presentation explores how Syrian men and women seeking refuge in a moment of unprecedented global displacement are received by countries of resettlement and asylum—the U.S., Canada, and Germany. It shows that human capital, typically examined as the skills immigrants bring with them that shape their potential, is actually created, transformed, or destroyed by receiving states’ incorporation policies.

PRFDHR Seminar: Ordinary People Under Extreme Life Conditions: Internal and External Forced Displacement from War-Torn Territories in Ukraine, Professor Oksana Mikheieva

The start of Russian aggression against Ukraine in 2014 led to the temporary occupation of the Crimea peninsula and parts of Donetsk and Luhansk region. With the beginning of Russian aggression more than 2 million people have left the uncontrolled territories of Ukraine and were forced to move both to other parts of Ukraine and beyond its borders. According to the Ministry of Social Policy, after 2015 and before the full-scale Russian invasion began on 24 February 2022, the number of registered internally displaced persons (IDPs) was relatively stable at around 1.5 million.

PRFDHR Seminar: Refusal as Political Practice: An Ethnography of Citizenship and Refugee Status, Professor Carole McGranahan

Is it possible to be both a refugee and a citizen? For six decades, Tibetan refugees have refused citizenship in South Asia as part of their claims to Tibetan state sovereignty. Tibetans therefore live in India and Nepal as refugee non-citizens, either undocumented or under-documented for multiple generations. In the last two decades, however, as Tibetans immigrate to North America, they are now gaining citizenship via political asylum, but simultaneously maintaining their belonging to the Dalai Lama’s refugee community headed by the exile Tibetan government.

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